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Life Course Changes in Smoking by Gender and Education: A Cohort Comparison Across France and the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Fred C. Pampel

    () (University of Colorado)

  • Damien Bricard

    () (Institut de recherche et documentation en économie de la santé (Irdes)
    Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques)

  • Myriam Khlat

    () (Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques)

  • Stéphane Legleye

    () (Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques
    CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay)

Abstract

Abstract Widening of educational disparities and a narrowing female advantage in mortality stem in good part from disparities in smoking. The changes in smoking and mortality disparities across cohorts and countries have been explained by an epidemic model of cigarette use but are also related to life course changes. To better describe and understand changing disparities over the life course, we compare age patterns of smoking in three cohorts and two nations (France and the US) using smoking history measures from the 2010 French health barometer (N = 20,940) and the 2010 US National Health Interview Survey Sample Adult File (N = 20,444). The results demonstrate statistically significant widening of gender and educational differences from adolescence to early and middle adulthood, thus accentuating the disparities already emerging during adolescence. In addition, the widening disparities over the life course have been changing across cohorts: age differences in educational disparities have grown in recent cohorts (especially in France), while age differences in gender disparities have narrowed. The findings highlight the multiple sources of inequality in smoking and health in high-income nations.

Suggested Citation

  • Fred C. Pampel & Damien Bricard & Myriam Khlat & Stéphane Legleye, 2017. "Life Course Changes in Smoking by Gender and Education: A Cohort Comparison Across France and the United States," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(3), pages 309-330, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:36:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11113-016-9424-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s11113-016-9424-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Damien Bricard & Stéphane Legleye & Myriam Khlat, 2018. "Changes in smoking behaviour over family transitions: evidence for anticipation and adaptation effects," Working Papers hal-01831985, HAL.
    2. Katrina M. Walsemann & Robert A. Hummer & Mark D. Hayward, 2018. "Heterogeneity in Educational Pathways and the Health Behavior of U.S. Young Adults," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 37(3), pages 343-366, June.

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    Keywords

    Smoking; Cohort; Life course; Education; Gender;

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