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Adolescent smoking and family structure in Europe

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  • Griesbach, Dawn
  • Amos, Amanda
  • Currie, Candace

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between family structure and smoking among 15-year-old adolescents in seven European countries. It also investigates the association between family structure and a number of known smoking risk factors including family socio-economic status, the adolescent's disposable income, parental smoking and the presence of other smokers in the adolescent's home. Findings are based on 1998 survey data from a cross-national study of health behaviours among children and adolescents. Family structure was found to be significantly associated with smoking among 15-year-olds in all countries, with smoking prevalence lowest among adolescents in intact families and highest among adolescents in stepfamilies. Multivariate analysis showed that several risk factors were associated with higher smoking prevalences in all countries, but that even after these other factors were taken into account, there was an increased likelihood of smoking among adolescents in stepfamilies. Further research is needed to determine the possible reasons for this association.

Suggested Citation

  • Griesbach, Dawn & Amos, Amanda & Currie, Candace, 2003. "Adolescent smoking and family structure in Europe," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 41-52, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:56:y:2003:i:1:p:41-52
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Francesconi & Stephen P. Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "The effect of lone motherhood on the smoking behavior of young adults," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(11), pages 1377-1384.
    2. Geir Wæhler Gustavsen & Rodolfo M. Nayga & Ximing Wu, 2016. "Effects of Parental Divorce on Teenage Children’s Risk Behaviors: Incidence and Persistence," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 474-487, September.
    3. Ben Lakhdar, Christian & Cauchie, Grégoire & Vaillant, Nicolas Gérard & Wolff, François-Charles, 2012. "The role of family incomes in cigarette smoking: Evidence from French students," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1864-1873.
    4. Jung, Se-Hwan & Tsakos, Georgios & Sheiham, Aubrey & Ryu, Jae-In & Watt, Richard G., 2010. "Socio-economic status and oral health-related behaviours in Korean adolescents," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(11), pages 1780-1788, June.
    5. Duncan McVicar & Arnold Polanski, 2014. "Peer Effects in UK Adolescent Substance Use: Never Mind the Classmates?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(4), pages 589-604, August.
    6. Duncan McVicar, 2012. "Cross Country Estimates of Peer Effects in Adolescent Smoking Using IV and School Fixed Effects," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n07, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Currie, Candace & Molcho, Michal & Boyce, William & Holstein, Bjørn & Torsheim, Torbjørn & Richter, Matthias, 2008. "Researching health inequalities in adolescents: The development of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Family Affluence Scale," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(6), pages 1429-1436, March.
    8. McVicar, Duncan, 2011. "Estimates of peer effects in adolescent smoking across twenty six European Countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1186-1193.
    9. Ben Lakhdar, Christian & Cauchie, Grégoire & Vaillant, Nicolas Gérard & Wolff, François-Charles, 2012. "The role of family incomes in cigarette smoking: Evidence from French students," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1864-1873.
    10. Moriarty, John & McVicar, Duncan & Higgins, Kathryn, 2016. "Cross-section and panel estimates of peer effects in early adolescent cannabis use: With a little help from my ‘friends once removed’," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 37-44.
    11. Kate Levin & Lorenza Dallago & Candace Currie, 2012. "The Association Between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent–Child Communication," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 106(2), pages 287-305, April.
    12. repec:kap:poprpr:v:36:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11113-016-9424-y is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Mair, Michael & Barlow, Alexandra & Woods, Susan E. & Kierans, Ciara & Milton, Beth & Porcellato, Lorna, 2006. "Lies, damned lies and statistics? Reliability and personal accounts of smoking among young people," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(4), pages 1009-1021, February.

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