IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/openec/v2y1991i3p219-236.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Asymmetric monetary policies? the case of Germany and France

Author

Listed:
  • Ulrich Camen
  • Hans Genberg
  • Michael Salemi

Abstract

How dissimilar are the policy objectives of the Bundesbank and the Banque de France and have those objectives converged since the conception of the EMS? We address these questions by estimating objective functions for the flexible-exchange-rate and the EMS periods. Vector autoregressions are used to characterize the economic environment and an inverse control methodology is used to infer the objectives of the central banks. We find that the Bundesbank's policy actions are compatible with its having consistently placed a high weight on the objective of price stability. The Banque de France on the other hand appears to have considered output stability to be an important target in the early EMS period. After a major French policy shift in 1982 the objectives of two Central Banks appear to be quite similar. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Suggested Citation

  • Ulrich Camen & Hans Genberg & Michael Salemi, 1991. "Asymmetric monetary policies? the case of Germany and France," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 219-236, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:2:y:1991:i:3:p:219-236
    DOI: 10.1007/BF01886142
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/BF01886142
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    2. Jacques Melitz, 1988. "The Prospect of a Depreciating Dollar and Possible Tension Inside the EMS," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 124(I), pages 1-21, March.
    3. Canzoneri, Matthew B, 1985. "Monetary Policy Games and the Role of Private Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1056-1070, December.
    4. Barro, Robert J & Gordon, David B, 1983. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural Rate Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 589-610, August.
    5. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Henderson, Dale W., 1988. "Is sovereign policymaking bad?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 93-140, January.
    6. Michele Fratianni & Juergen Hagen, 1990. "German dominance in the EMS," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 67-87, February.
    7. Fratianni, Michele & von Hagen, Juergen, 1990. "The European Monetary System ten years after," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 173-241, January.
    8. Giavazzi, Francesco, 1988. "Incentives to fix the exchange rate," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(2-3), pages 382-387, March.
    9. Barro, Robert J., 1989. "Interest-rate targeting," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 3-30, January.
    10. Michele Fratianni & Juergen Hagen, 1992. "German dominance in the EMS:The empirical evidence," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 127-128, February.
    11. Canzoneri, Matthew B & Gray, Jo Anna, 1985. "Monetary Policy Games and the Consequences of Non-cooperative Behavior," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 26(3), pages 547-564, October.
    12. Gilles Oudiz & Jeffrey Sachs, 1985. "International Policy Coordination in Dynamic Macroeconomic Models," NBER Chapters,in: International Economic Policy Coordination, pages 274-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Joseph Daniels & David VanHoose, 1998. "Two-Country Models of Monetary and Fiscal Policy: What Have We Learned? What More Can We Learn?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 265-284, July.
    2. Robert Marti, 1995. "Spécification des préférences implicites en matière de politique économique française, 1981-1991," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 119(3), pages 1-11.
    3. Robert Marti, 1995. "Révélation de la fonction de bien-être du politique et instabilité de la fonction de popularité," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 46(3), pages 879-887.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:2:y:1991:i:3:p:219-236. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.