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Chaotic Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux

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  • Sergio Da Silva

Abstract

This article generalizes the results shown in De Grauwe, Dewachter, and Embrechts (1993) in a more sophisticated framework. In their model, the speculative dynamics resulting from the interaction between chartists and fundamentalists are incorporated into a Dornbusch-style model to generate a chaotic nominal exchange rate. Here the model of Obstfeld and Rogoff (1995, 1996) replaces the Dornbusch model, and chaotic solutions are still shown to be possible for sensible parameter values. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Suggested Citation

  • Sergio Da Silva, 2001. "Chaotic Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 281-304, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:12:y:2001:i:3:p:281-304
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1011181423098
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 624-660, June.
    2. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 1996. "Foundations of International Macroeconomics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262150476, January.
    3. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-1176, December.
    4. Blake LeBaron, 1994. "Chaos and Nonlinear Forecastability in Economics and Finance," Finance 9411001, EconWPA.
    5. Fender, John & Yip, Chong K., 2000. "Tariffs and exchange rate dynamics redux," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 633-655, October.
    6. Szpiro, George G., 1994. "Exchange rate speculation and chaos inducing intervention," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 363-368, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simón Sosvilla-Rivero & Fernando Fernández-Rodriguez & Julián Andrada-Félix, 2005. "Testing chaotic dynamics via Lyapunov exponents," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 911-930.
    2. Pierdzioch, Christian, 2005. "Noise trading and delayed exchange rate overshooting," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 133-156, September.
    3. Resende, Marcelo & Zeidan, Rodrigo M., 2008. "Expectations and chaotic dynamics: Empirical evidence on exchange rates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 33-35, April.
    4. Pierdzioch, Christian, 2002. "Exchange Rate Expectations Redux and Monetary Policy," Kiel Working Papers 1109, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Sergio Da Silva, 2004. "International Finance, Levy Distributions, and the Econophysics of Exchange Rates," International Finance 0405018, EconWPA.
    6. Hommes, Cars & Kiseleva, Tatiana & Kuznetsov, Yuri & Verbic, Miroslav, 2012. "Is More Memory In Evolutionary Selection (De)Stabilizing?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(03), pages 335-357, June.
    7. Federici, Daniela & Gandolfo, Giancarlo, 2012. "The Euro/Dollar exchange rate: Chaotic or non-chaotic? A continuous time model with heterogeneous beliefs," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 670-681.
    8. Daniela Federici & Giancarlo Gandolfo, 2011. "The Euro/Dollar Exchange Rate: Chaotic or Non-Chaotic?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3420, CESifo Group Munich.

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