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Do real payments really matter? A re-examination of the compromise effect in hypothetical and binding choice settings

  • Holger Müller


  • Eike Kroll


  • Bodo Vogt


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Article provided by Springer in its journal Marketing Letters.

Volume (Year): 23 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 73-92

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Handle: RePEc:kap:mktlet:v:23:y:2012:i:1:p:73-92
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  1. Cox, James C. & Grether, David M., 1993. "The Preference Reversal Phenomenon: Response Mode, Markets and Incentives," Working Papers 810, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  2. Wilcox, Nathaniel T, 1993. "Lottery Choice: Incentives, Complexity and Decision Time," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(421), pages 1397-1417, November.
  3. John List, 2002. "Preference Reversals of a Different Kind: The 'More is Less' Phenomenon," Framed Field Experiments 00509, The Field Experiments Website.
  4. Francisca Sinn & Sandra Milberg & Leonardo Epstein & Ronald Goodstein, 2007. "Compromising the compromise effect: Brands matter," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 223-236, December.
  5. Payne, John W & Bettman, James R & Schkade, David A, 1999. "Measuring Constructed Preferences: Towards a Building Code," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 19(1-3), pages 243-70, December.
  6. Calder, Bobby J & Phillips, Lynn W & Tybout, Alice M, 1981. " Designing Research for Application," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 197-207, September.
  7. Hoyer, Wayne D & Brown, Steven P, 1990. " Effects of Brand Awareness on Choice for a Common, Repeat-Purchase Product," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 141-48, September.
  8. James Murphy & P. Allen & Thomas Stevens & Darryl Weatherhead, 2005. "A Meta-analysis of Hypothetical Bias in Stated Preference Valuation," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 30(3), pages 313-325, 03.
  9. Huber, Joel & Puto, Christopher, 1983. " Market Boundaries and Product Choice: Illustrating Attraction and Substitution Effects," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 31-44, June.
  10. Wernerfelt, Birger, 1995. " A Rational Reconstruction of the Compromise Effect: Using Market Data to Infer Utilities," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 627-33, March.
  11. Sen, Sankar, 1998. " Knowledge, Information Mode, and the Attraction Effect," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 64-77, June.
  12. Beattie, Jane & Loomes, Graham, 1997. "The Impact of Incentives upon Risky Choice Experiments," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 155-68, March.
  13. Pan, Yigang & Lehmann, Donald R, 1993. " The Influence of New Brand Entry on Subjective Brand Judgments," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 76-86, June.
  14. Grether, David M & Plott, Charles R, 1979. "Economic Theory of Choice and the Preference Reversal Phenomenon," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(4), pages 623-38, September.
  15. Huber, Joel & Payne, John W & Puto, Christopher, 1982. " Adding Asymmetrically Dominated Alternatives: Violations of Regularity and the Similarity Hypothesis," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(1), pages 90-98, June.
  16. Ratneshwar, Srinivasan & Shocker, Allan D & Stewart, David W, 1987. " Toward Understanding the Attraction Effect: The Implications of Product Stimulus Meaningfulness and Familiarity," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(4), pages 520-33, March.
  17. Peterson, Robert A, 2001. " On the Use of College Students in Social Science Research: Insights from a Second-Order Meta-analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(3), pages 450-61, December.
  18. Simonson, Itamar, 1989. " Choice Based on Reasons: The Case of Attraction and Compromise Effects," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 158-74, September.
  19. Dhar, Ravi, 1997. " Consumer Preference for a No-Choice Option," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 215-31, September.
  20. Doron Sonsino, 2010. "The irrelevant-menu affect on valuation," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 309-333, September.
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