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Attraction and superiority effects in the Chilean marketplace: Do they exist with real brands?

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  • Celedon, Paulina
  • Milberg, Sandra
  • Sinn, Francisca

Abstract

Consumer researchers show much interest in how the addition of products to a choice set changes the alignment of choice shares of existing products, specifically the attraction and superiority effects. Research in developed countries accounts for the vast majority of studies on these effects. Findings demonstrate that the attraction and superiority effects are robust when brand names are absent from product offerings. Testing whether these effects, with unbranded alternatives, will generalize to a different cultural context, in particular the Chilean market, is important. In addition, this paper extends prior research by further testing the generalizability of these effects in more realistic market scenarios that include brand alternatives. In the absence of brands, these effects generalize to the Chilean market; however, the inclusion of brands moderates these effects such that the results show no evidence of the attraction or superiority effects when the entrant's brand is more familiar than competitors' brands. The explanation for this observation is that consumers prefer more familiar brand alternatives even when these options are inferior with regard to product attribute trade-offs.

Suggested Citation

  • Celedon, Paulina & Milberg, Sandra & Sinn, Francisca, 2013. "Attraction and superiority effects in the Chilean marketplace: Do they exist with real brands?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(10), pages 1780-1786.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:66:y:2013:i:10:p:1780-1786
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2013.01.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simonson, Itamar, 1989. " Choice Based on Reasons: The Case of Attraction and Compromise Effects," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 158-174, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Lichters & Paul Bengart & Marko Sarstedt & Bodo Vogt, 2017. "What really matters in attraction effect research: when choices have economic consequences," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 127-138, March.
    2. Raventós, Pedro & Ospina, José Miguel, 2013. "Strategic management in Latin America: Introduction to a special section," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(10), pages 1725-1727.
    3. Gomez, Yolanda & Martínez-Molés, Víctor & Urbano, Amparo & Vila, Jose, 2016. "The attraction effect in mid-involvement categories: An experimental economics approach," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(11), pages 5082-5088.
    4. repec:spr:amsrev:v:6:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s13162-016-0074-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Marcel Lichters & Marko Sarstedt & Bodo Vogt, 2015. "On the practical relevance of the attraction effect: A cautionary note and guidelines for context effect experiments," Business & Information Systems Engineering: The International Journal of WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK, Springer;Gesellschaft für Informatik e.V. (GI), vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, June.
    6. repec:spr:amsrev:v:5:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s13162-015-0066-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lichters, Marcel & Müller, Holger & Sarstedt, Marko & Vogt, Bodo, 2016. "How durable are compromise effects?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(10), pages 4056-4064.

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    Keywords

    Attraction effect; Brand; Consumer choice;

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