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Crowding in or crowding out: the link between academic entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial traits

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  • Cornelia Kolb

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  • Marcus Wagner

Abstract

The entrepreneurship literature has identified several entrepreneurial traits as being important to become a successful entrepreneur. Using the Five Factor personality model we analyze differences between two types of entrepreneurs: Individuals founding an enterprise out of university employment and graduates who are not employed at the university before starting a company. To analyze potential differences in personality between these two groups we use a unique data set of former students from a large German university. We show that entrepreneurs out of the university context possess lower levels of openness to experience as well as higher levels of agreeableness. Also, we provide evidence for the importance of the predominant type of knowledge upon which academic ventures are built. The findings confirm that entrepreneurs out of the university context overly focus on the scientific aspects of their start-up idea and thus may pursue it in a potentially suboptimal manner, but that this can be mitigated by dedicated support measures and structures within the university, for which we also provide specific examples. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Cornelia Kolb & Marcus Wagner, 2015. "Crowding in or crowding out: the link between academic entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial traits," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 387-408, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:40:y:2015:i:3:p:387-408
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-014-9346-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mike Wright & Bart Clarysse & Philippe Mustar & Andy Lockett, 2007. "Academic Entrepreneurship in Europe," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 4041.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10961-018-9657-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Rosa Caiazza & Aileen Richardson & David Audretsch, 2015. "Knowledge effects on competitiveness: from firms to regional advantage," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(6), pages 899-909, December.
    3. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10961-017-9647-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10961-017-9629-1 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic entrepreneurship; Personality traits; Five Factor model; Technology transfer; Knowledge transfer; L26; O31; J23;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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