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Conflict between entrepreneurship and open science, and the transition of scientific norms

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  • Sotaro Shibayama

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Abstract

In the trend of academic entrepreneurship, practical and direct contribution of university research to the society has been emphasized, in which university scientists have increasingly engaged in commercial activities, university-industry relationships, and technology transfers. However, this trend has aroused concern about a potentially negative impact on the tradition of open science. Drawing on a survey data of 698 Japanese natural scientists, this study analyzes the behaviors and norms of university scientists under the influence of university interventions for entrepreneurship, whereby examining the compatibility between entrepreneurship and open science. The results indicate that entrepreneurial interventions have facilitated scientists’ norm for practical contribution, and consequently, their involvement in commercial activities and ties with industry. Then, some, but not all, of these entrepreneurial activities have deterred cooperative or open relationships between scientists. However, the results suggest that the entrepreneurial interventions have not deteriorated the traditional norm for open science. Further analyses indicate that the two norms for practical contribution and for open science are determined independently, implying that academic entrepreneurship can be promoted without deteriorating open science. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Sotaro Shibayama, 2012. "Conflict between entrepreneurship and open science, and the transition of scientific norms," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 508-531, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:37:y:2012:i:4:p:508-531 DOI: 10.1007/s10961-010-9202-7
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    Cited by:

    1. Allen T. Alexander & Kristel Miller & Sean Fielding, 2015. "Open For Business: Universities, Entrepreneurial Academics And Open Innovation," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 19(06), pages 1-21, December.
    2. Harvey Goldstein & Alexander Rehbogen, 2013. "University engagement and knowledge commercialization: an analysis of faculty attitudes," Chapters,in: Knowledge Commercialization and Valorization in Regional Economic Development, chapter 4, pages 61-84 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Ani Gerbin & Mateja Drnovsek, 2016. "Determinants and public policy implications of academic-industry knowledge transfer in life sciences: a review and a conceptual framework," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(5), pages 979-1076, October.
    4. Cornelia Kolb & Marcus Wagner, 2015. "Crowding in or crowding out: the link between academic entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial traits," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 387-408, June.
    5. Hsing-fen Lee & Marcela Miozzo, 2015. "How does working on university–industry collaborative projects affect science and engineering doctorates’ careers? Evidence from a UK research-based university," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 293-317, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Entrepreneurship; Academic capitalism; Commercialism; Open science; Scientific norm; I23; O38;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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