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Local context, academic entrepreneurship and open science: Publication secrecy and commercial activity among Japanese and US scientists

  • Walsh, John P.
  • Huang, Hsini
Registered author(s):

    Like the US before it, Japan has adopted a series of policy initiatives designed to encourage the commercialization of academic science. However, such initiatives may also adversely affect “open-science”. Based on matched surveys of almost 1000 researchers in Japan and over 800 in the US, the paper examines rates of commercial activity, reasons to patent, and secrecy related to research results. In particular, it examines the extent to which participation in commercial activity is associated with publication secrecy. The results show that patenting rates are higher in Japan, while industry funding is more common in the US. In addition, the overall level of publication secrecy is greater in Japan. And, in both countries, individuals who are commercially active are less likely to share their research results through publication. But, patents are less directly linked to commercial activity in Japan than in the US, and have less impact on academic secrecy. The results suggest that academic entrepreneurship is associated with reduced participation in open science, but that the extent of adverse effects depends significantly on institutional context.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

    Volume (Year): 43 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 245-260

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:43:y:2014:i:2:p:245-260
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

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