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On preference imprecision

Author

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  • Robin Cubitt

    ()

  • Daniel Navarro-Martinez
  • Chris Starmer

Abstract

Recent research invokes preference imprecision to explain violations of individual decision theory. While these inquiries are suggestive, the nature and significance of such imprecision remain poorly understood. We explore three questions using a new measurement tool in an experimental investigation of imprecision in lottery valuations: Does such preference imprecision vary coherently with lottery structure? Is it stable on repeat measurement? Does it have explanatory value for economic behaviour? We find that imprecision behaves coherently, shows no tendency to change systematically with experience, is related to choice variability, but is not a main driver of the violations of standard decision theory that we consider. Copyright The Author(s) 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Robin Cubitt & Daniel Navarro-Martinez & Chris Starmer, 2015. "On preference imprecision," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 1-34, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrisku:v:50:y:2015:i:1:p:1-34
    DOI: 10.1007/s11166-015-9207-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giuseppe Attanasi & Nikolaos Georgantzís & Valentina Rotondi & Daria Vigani, 2018. "Lottery- and survey-based risk attitudes linked through a multichoice elicitation task," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 341-372, May.
    2. Noemí Herranz-Zarzoso & Gerardo Sabater-Grande, 2018. "Framing and repetition effects on risky choices: A behavioral approach," Working Papers 2018/04, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
    3. Bayrak, Oben, 2016. "Another Solution for Allais Paradox: Preference Imprecision, Dispersion and Pessimism," MPRA Paper 71780, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Sean Horan & Paola Manzini & Marco Mariotti, 2018. "Precision May Harm: The Comparative Statics of Imprecise Judgement," Working Paper Series 1518, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    5. repec:jdm:journl:v:13:y:2018:i:6:p:587-606 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Qiu, Jianying, 2015. "Completing incomplete preferences," MPRA Paper 72933, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 18 Jul 2016.
    7. Braun, Carola & Rehdanz, Katrin & Schmidt, Ulrich, 2016. "Validity of Willingness to Pay Measures under Preference Uncertainty," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 141320, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Preference imprecision; Imprecision intervals; Noisy preferences; Violations of expected utility theory; Construct validity; D81; C91; D01; D03;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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