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Imprecision as an account of violations of independence and betweenness

  • Butler, David
  • Loomes, Graham

In an earlier paper we put forward a model of imprecise preferences which accounted for various forms of preference reversal. In this paper we show that the same model can also explain the best-known violations of expected utility theory's axioms of independence and betweenness. It appears that a simple model of imprecise preferences can account for a broader range of anomalies than many of the more elaborate alternative theories developed to date.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268111001284
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 80 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 511-522

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:80:y:2011:i:3:p:511-522
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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  1. Loomes, Graham, 2006. "(How) Can we value health, safety and the environment?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 713-736, December.
  2. David J. Butler & Graham C. Loomes, 2007. "Imprecision as an Account of the Preference Reversal Phenomenon," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 277-297, March.
  3. David Buschena & David Zilberman, 1999. "Testing the Effects of Similarity on Risky Choice: Implications for Violations of Expected Utility," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 253-280, June.
  4. Pavlo Blavatskyy & Wolfgang Köhler, 2009. "Range effects and lottery pricing," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 332-349, September.
  5. Schmidt, Ulrich & Starmer, Chris & Sugden, Robert, 2008. "Third-generation prospect theory," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 28932, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  6. Starmer, Chris & Sugden, Robert, 1991. "Does the Random-Lottery Incentive System Elicit True Preferences? An Experimental Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 971-78, September.
  7. Loomes, Graham & Sugden, Robert, 1982. "Regret Theory: An Alternative Theory of Rational Choice under Uncertainty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 805-24, December.
  8. Ian Bateman & Brett Day & Graham Loomes & Robert Sugden, 2007. "Can ranking techniques elicit robust values?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 49-66, February.
  9. Pavlo Blavatskyy, 2009. "Preference reversals and probabilistic decisions," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 237-250, December.
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