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Skills, sunspots and cycles

Listed author(s):
  • Francesco Busato

    ()

  • Enrico Marchetti

This paper explores the ability of a class of one-sector, multi-input models to generate indeterminate equilibrium paths, and endogenous cycles, without relying on factors' hoarding. The model presents a novel theoretical economic mechanism that supports sunspot-driven expansions without requiring upward sloping labor demand schedules. Its distinctive characteristic is that the skill composition of aggregate labor demand drives expansionary i.i.d. demand shocks. Next, the model explains the labor market dynamics from the supply side, while endogenizing the capital productivity response to changes in the aggregate labor demand composition. Last but not least, it is worth to mention that the model presents an effective shock propagation mechanism that operates into the labor market and across labor market segments through the cross elasticities of equilibrium labor demand and supplies. In this respect the model can be seen as quite general formulation (with or without aggregate increasing returns to scale) for analyzing labor market dynamics within a general equilibrium model with labor market segmentation.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00712-009-0067-x
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 97 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 189-215

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jeczfn:v:97:y:2009:i:3:p:189-215
DOI: 10.1007/s00712-009-0067-x
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

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  1. Benhabib, Jess & Farmer, Roger E.A., 1995. "Indeterminacy and Sector-Specific Externalities," Working Papers 95-02, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  2. Bennett, Rosalind L. & Farmer, Roger E. A., 2000. "Indeterminacy with Non-separable Utility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 118-143, July.
  3. Miguel Jimenez & Domenico Marchetti, 2002. "Interpreting the procyclical productivity of manufacturing sectors: can we really rule out external effects?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(7), pages 805-817.
  4. Sbordone, Argia M, 1997. "Interpreting the Procyclical Productivity of Manufacturing Sectors: External Effects or Labor Hoarding?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 26-45, February.
  5. Roger E. A. Farmer, 1999. "Macroeconomics of Self-fulfilling Prophecies, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262062038.
  6. GRANDMONT, Jean-Michel & PINTUS, Patrick & de VILDER, Robin, 1997. "Capital-labor substitution and competitive nonlinear endogenous business cycles," CORE Discussion Papers 1997087, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  7. Pintus, Patrick A., 2007. "Local determinacy with non-separable utility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 669-682, February.
  8. Teresa Lloyd-Braga & Carine Nourry & Alain Venditti, 2006. "Indeterminacy with small externalities: The role of non-separable preferences," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 2(3-4), pages 217-239.
  9. Susanto Basu & John G. Fernald, 1996. "Returns to scale in U.S. production: estimates and implications," International Finance Discussion Papers 546, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  10. Weder, Mark, 2003. "On the plausibility of sunspot equilibria," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 65-81, March.
  11. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
  12. Judith Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2004. "Production Function and Wage Equation Estimation with Heterogenous Labor: Evidence from a New Matched Employer-Employee Dataset," Working Papers 04-05, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  13. Roger E.A. Farmer & Jang Ting Guo, 1992. "Real Business Cycles and the Animal Spirits Hypothesis," UCLA Economics Working Papers 680, UCLA Department of Economics.
  14. Wen, Yi, 1998. "Capacity Utilization under Increasing Returns to Scale," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 7-36, July.
  15. Benhabib, J. & Farmer, R.E.A, 1991. "Indeterminacy and Increasing Returns," Papers 165, Cambridge - Risk, Information & Quantity Signals.
  16. Perli, Roberto, 1998. "Indeterminacy, home production, and the business cycle: A calibrated analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 105-125, February.
  17. Francesco Busato & Bruno Chiarini, 2004. "Market and underground activities in a two-sector dynamic equilibrium model," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 23(4), pages 831-861, May.
  18. Chris Papageorgiou, 2003. "Distinguishing Between the Effects of Primary and Post-primary Education on Economic Growth," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(4), pages 622-635, November.
  19. Jinill Kim, 1997. "Three sources of increasing returns to scale," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-18, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  20. Jang-Ting Guo & Kevin J. Lansing, 2007. "Maintenance expenditures and indeterminacy under increasing returns to scale," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 3(2), pages 147-158.
  21. Susumu Imai & Michael P. Keane, 2004. "Intertemporal Labor Supply and Human Capital Accumulation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(2), pages 601-641, 05.
  22. Guo, Jang-Ting & Harrison, Sharon G., 2001. "Indeterminacy with capital utilization and sector-specific externalities," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 355-360, September.
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