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The creative instability hypothesis

  • Peter Earl

    ()

  • Jason Potts

    ()

This paper provides an analysis of why many ‘stars’ tend to fade away rather than enjoying ongoing branding advantages from their reputations. We propose a theory of market overshooting in creative industries that is based on Schumpeterian competition between producers to maintain the interest of boundedly rational fans. As creative producers compete by offering further artistic novelty, this escalation of product complexity eventually leads to overshooting. We propose this as a theory of endogenous cycles in the creative industries. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10824-012-9174-6
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Cultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 153-173

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:37:y:2013:i:2:p:153-173
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100284

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  1. Donata Favaro & Carlofilippo Frateschi, 2007. "A discrete choice model of consumption of cultural goods: the case of music," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 205-234, September.
  2. Throsby, David, 1994. "The Production and Consumption of the Arts: A View of Cultural Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-29, March.
  3. Gary B. Magee, 2002. "Rethinking Invention: Cognition and the Economics of Technological Creativity," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 861, The University of Melbourne.
  4. Earl, Peter E., 2001. "Simon's travel theorem and the demand for live music," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 335-358, June.
  5. Paulo Brito & Carlos Barros, 2005. "Learning-by-Consuming and the Dynamics of the Demand and Prices of Cultural Goods," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 83-106, May.
  6. Jason Potts & Stuart Cunningham & John Hartley & Paul Ormerod, 2008. "Social network markets: a new definition of the creative industries," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 167-185, September.
  7. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
  8. Rosen, Sherwin, 1981. "The Economics of Superstars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(5), pages 845-58, December.
  9. Daniel John Zizzo, 2003. "Empirical evidence on interdependent preferences: nature or nurture?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(6), pages 867-880, November.
  10. Adler, Moshe, 1985. "Stardom and Talent," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(1), pages 208-12, March.
  11. Scitovsky, Tibor, 1981. "The Desire for Excitement in Modern Society," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(1), pages 3-13.
  12. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
  13. Earl, Peter E. & Peng, Ti-Ching & Potts, Jason, 2007. "Decision-rule cascades and the dynamics of speculative bubbles," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 351-364, June.
  14. Peter E. Earl & Jason Potts, 2004. "The market for preferences," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(4), pages 619-633, July.
  15. Lanham, Richard A., 2006. "The Economics of Attention," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226468822.
  16. A. Norman & A. Ahmed & J. Chou & A. Dalal & K. Fortson & M. Jindal & C. Kurz & H. Lee & K. Payne & R. Rando & K. Sheppard & E. Sublett & J. Sussman & I. White, 2004. "On the Computational Complexity of Consumer Decision Rules," Computational Economics, Society for Computational Economics, vol. 23(2), pages 173-192, 03.
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