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A Distributional Argument for Supply-Side Climate Policies

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  • Geir Asheim

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Abstract

This paper presents a distributional argument for the use of supply-side climate policies whereby carbon emissions are controlled through (i) depletion quotas or (ii) permanent confiscation of a fraction of the in situ carbon stocks. The modeling considers intertemporal competitive equilibria in the Cobb-Douglas version of the Dasgupta-Heal-Solow-Stiglitz model of capital accumulation and costless resource extraction. It is shown how policies (i) and (ii) preserve the functional distribution of income between capital owners and resource owners, compared to the case where no climate policy is needed, while suggested demand-side policies do not. Such observations are of interest as avoiding functional redistribution may facilitate climate change negotiations. The paper discusses policy implications of the analysis outside the simplified setting of the stylized model. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Geir Asheim, 2013. "A Distributional Argument for Supply-Side Climate Policies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(2), pages 239-254, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:56:y:2013:i:2:p:239-254
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-012-9590-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth Arrow & Partha Dasgupta & Karl-Göran Mäler, 2003. "Evaluating Projects and Assessing Sustainable Development in Imperfect Economies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(4), pages 647-685, December.
    2. Asheim, Geir B. & Hartwick, John M., 2011. "Anomalies in green national accounting," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(12), pages 2303-2307.
    3. Geir Asheim & Taoyuan Wei, 2009. "Sectoral Income," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 42(1), pages 65-87, January.
    4. R. M. Solow, 1974. "Intergenerational Equity and Exhaustible Resources," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(5), pages 29-45.
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    7. Joseph E. Aldy & Alan J. Krupnick & Richard G. Newell & Ian W. H. Parry & William A. Pizer, 2010. "Designing Climate Mitigation Policy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(4), pages 903-934, December.
    8. Reyer Gerlagh, 2011. "Too Much Oil," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 57(1), pages 79-102, March.
    9. Liski, Matti & Tahvonen, Olli, 2004. "Can carbon tax eat OPEC's rents?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 1-12, January.
    10. Asheim, Geir B. & Buchholz, Wolfgang & Hartwick, John M. & Mitra, Tapan & Withagen, Cees, 2007. "Constant savings rates and quasi-arithmetic population growth under exhaustible resource constraints," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 213-229, March.
    11. Coase, Ronald H, 1972. "Durability and Monopoly," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 143-149, April.
    12. J. A. Sefton & M. R. Weale, 2006. "The Concept of Income in a General Equilibrium," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 219-249.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2015. "Buy coal for preservation and act strategically on the fuel market," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 178-15, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.
    2. Cathrine Hagem & Halvor Briseid Storrøsten, 2016. "Supply versus demand-side policies in the presence of carbon leakage and the green paradox," Discussion Papers 836, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Weitzman, Martin L., 2017. "Voting on prices vs. voting on quantities in a World Climate Assembly," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 199-211.
    4. Quaas, Martin F. & Bröcker, Johannes, 2016. "Substitutability and the social cost of carbon in a solvable growth model with irreversible climate change," Economics Working Papers 2016-09, Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, Department of Economics.
    5. Martin L. Weitzman, 2014. "Can Negotiating a Uniform Carbon Price Help to Internalize the Global Warming Externality?," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 29-49.
    6. Kim Collins & Roman Mendelevitch, 2015. "Leaving Coal Unburned: Options for Demand-Side and Supply-Side Policies," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 87, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Eichner, Thomas & Pethig, Rüdiger, 2017. "Trade in fossil fuel deposits for preservation and strategic action," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 50-61.
    8. Jan Siegmeier & Linus Mattauch & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2015. "Climate Policy Enhances Efficiency: A Macroeconomic Portfolio Effect," CESifo Working Paper Series 5161, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Martin L. Weitzman, 2016. "How a Minimum Carbon Price Commitment Might Help to Internalize the Global Warming Externality," NBER Working Papers 22197, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. repec:eee:eecrev:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:77-92 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Thomas Eichner & Rüdiger Pethig, 2015. "Buy coal to mitigate climate damage and benefit from strategic deposit action," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 177-15, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change negotiations; Supply-side climate policies; Functional income distribution; Non-renewable resources; Q54; D33; Q30;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • D33 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Factor Income Distribution
    • Q30 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - General

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