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Teacher Literacy and Numeracy Skills: International Evidence from PIAAC and ALL

Author

Listed:
  • Bart H. H. Golsteyn

    () (Maastricht University)

  • Stan Vermeulen

    () (Maastricht University)

  • Inge Wolf

    () (Maastricht University)

Abstract

Using the OECD-studies PIAAC and ALL, this paper shows that teachers on average have better literacy and numeracy skills than other respondents in almost all of the 15 countries in the samples. In most countries, teachers outperform others in the bottom percentiles, while in some countries they perform better than others throughout the skill distribution. These results imply that the scope to improve teachers’ skills varies between countries and that policy makers should take the shape of the skills distribution into account when designing interventions in order to most efficiently raise teachers’ skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Bart H. H. Golsteyn & Stan Vermeulen & Inge Wolf, 2016. "Teacher Literacy and Numeracy Skills: International Evidence from PIAAC and ALL," De Economist, Springer, vol. 164(4), pages 365-389, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:164:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10645-016-9284-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10645-016-9284-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, March.
    2. Hanushek, Eric A. & Pace, Richard R., 1995. "Who chooses to teach (and why)?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 101-117, June.
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    4. Metzler, Johannes & Woessmann, Ludger, 2012. "The impact of teacher subject knowledge on student achievement: Evidence from within-teacher within-student variation," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 486-496.
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    10. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aenneli Houkes-Hommes & Bas Weel & Karen Wiel, 2016. "Measuring the Contribution of Primary-School Teachers to Education Outcomes in The Netherlands," De Economist, Springer, vol. 164(4), pages 357-364, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Teachers; Skills; Human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets

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