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The macroeconomic impacts of government debt: An empirical analysis of the 1980s and 1990s

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  • Mark Wheeler

Abstract

This study examines the macroeconomic impacts of government debt. Unlike previous studies, the current study restricts the estimation period to the 1980s and 1990s. The analysis is conducted using variance decompositions and impulse response functions derived from a vector autoregressive model. The results presented here support an extreme form of the Ricardian equivalence hypothesis. In this view, wealth falls as government debt rises. Because wealth falls as government debt rises, an increase in government debt leads to decreases in interest rates, output, and the price level. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 1999

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  • Mark Wheeler, 1999. "The macroeconomic impacts of government debt: An empirical analysis of the 1980s and 1990s," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 27(3), pages 273-284, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:27:y:1999:i:3:p:273-284 DOI: 10.1007/BF02299578
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    Cited by:

    1. E Lau & S Abu Mansor & C-H Puah, 2010. "Revival of the Twin Deficits in Asian Crisis-affected Countries," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 15(1), pages 29-54, March.
    2. Gumus, Erdal, 2003. "Crowding-Out Hypothesis versus Ricardian Equivalence Proposition: Evidence from Literature," MPRA Paper 42141, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Tomas Wroblowsky, 2007. "Explaining the Variability of Debt Neutrality Tests Results: A Meta-Analysis of Ricardian Equivalence," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 5(1), pages 7-24.
    4. Puah, Chin-Hong & Lau, Evan & Tan, Kim Lee, 2006. "Budget-current account deficits nexus in Malaysia," MPRA Paper 37677, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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