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An Empirical Analysis of Housing Price Appreciation in a Market Stratified by Size and Value of the Housing Stock

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Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between house size and appreciation, and house value and appreciation evidenced in the data collected from a single geographic region. The analysis of the data suggests that high price housing appreciates at a more rapid rate than low and medium price housing during expansionary periods, and there is no statistical difference in the rates of price change in contractionary periods. Further, the rate of price change for larger homes exhibits no consistent difference from the rate of change for small and medium size housing for the time period studied.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Allen Seward & Charles J. Delaney & Marc T. Smith, 1992. "An Empirical Analysis of Housing Price Appreciation in a Market Stratified by Size and Value of the Housing Stock," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 7(2), pages 195-206.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:7:n:2:1992:p:195-206
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dhillon, Upinder S & Shilling, James D & Sirmans, C F, 1987. "Choosing between Fixed and Adjustable Rate Mortgages: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 19(2), pages 260-267, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher J. Mayer, 1993. "Taxes, income distribution, and the real estate cycle: why all houses do not appreciate at the same rate," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue May, pages 39-50.
    2. Niu, G., 2014. "Essays on subjective expectations and mortality trends," Other publications TiSEM b9f72836-d8ad-478b-adca-4, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    4. Steven C. Bourassa & Donald R. Haurin & Jessica L. Haurin & Martin Hoesli & Jian Sun, 2009. "House Price Changes and Idiosyncratic Risk: The Impact of Property Characteristics," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(2), pages 259-278.
    5. Yongqiang Chu, 2014. "Credit constraints, inelastic supply, and the housing boom," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(1), pages 52-69, January.
    6. Damian S. Damianov & Diego Escobari, 2016. "Long-run Equilibrium Shift and Short-run Dynamics of U.S. Home Price Tiers During the Housing Bubble," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 1-28, July.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

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