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Wage policies in the public sector during wholesale privatization

Author

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  • Jelena Nikolic

    (Northeastern University, USA)

Abstract

Examining the implications of changes in public sector wage-setting arrangements due to privatization is a relatively new area of economics research, with few studies having analyzed the effects of public sector restructuring on relative wages in developed countries. There is, however, a growing empirical literature that measures the effects of transitioning from central planning to market-based systems on public–private sector wage differentials. Policymakers can learn from this evidence about the ways in which ownership transformation affects the distribution of wages in both the public and private employment sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Jelena Nikolic, 2017. "Wage policies in the public sector during wholesale privatization," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 388-388, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izawol:journl:y:2017:n:388
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jelena Nikolic, 2014. "The effect of large-scale privatization on public sector pay gap in a transition economy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(4), pages 759-781, October.
    2. Francisco de Castro & Matteo Salto & Hugo Steiner, 2013. "The gap between public and private wages: new evidence for the EU," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 508, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    3. Andrew Newell & Mieczyslaw W. Socha, 2007. "The Polish wage inequality explosion," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 733-758, October.
    4. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Sabirianova Peter, Klara, 2007. "Public sector pay and corruption: Measuring bribery from micro data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(5-6), pages 963-991, June.
    5. Kristjan-Olari Leping, 2006. "Evolution of the Public-Private Sector Wage Differential during Transition in Estonia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 419-436.
    6. Vladimir Gimpelson & Anna Lukiyanova & Anna Sharunina, 2015. "Estimating the Public-Private Wage Gap in Russia: What Does Quantile Regression Tell Us?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 104/EC/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    7. Jelena Lausev, 2014. "WHAT HAS 20 YEARS OF PUBLIC–PRIVATE PAY GAP LITERATURE TOLD US? EASTERN EUROPEAN TRANSITIONING vs. DEVELOPED ECONOMIES," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 516-550, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public sector; wage compression; economic transition; wage policies;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions

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