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The Impact of Innovation on Job Satisfaction: Evidence from U.S. Federal Agencies

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  • Soyoung Park
  • Yinglee Tseng
  • Sungchan Kim

Abstract

Organizational innovation has been commonly considered as the strategic means for performance improvement in an organization. However, there is little research regarding how innovative practices influence individual work satisfaction in public organizations. Thus, this paper aims to examine how innovative practices will affect public employees¡¯ job satisfaction using the results of the 2013 U.S. Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS). The findings indicate that organizational practice toward innovation has a positive impact on job satisfaction. On the other hand, supervisors, underrepresented groups such as females and ethnic minorities, and older employees perceive that innovation has a negative impact on job satisfaction. However, employees with a higher level of work experience and payment grade believe that innovation leads to more job satisfaction. Moreover, employees in regulatory agencies perceive that innovation is negatively related to job satisfaction, while employees in distributive agencies perceive that innovation is positively related to job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Soyoung Park & Yinglee Tseng & Sungchan Kim, 2016. "The Impact of Innovation on Job Satisfaction: Evidence from U.S. Federal Agencies," Asian Social Science, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 12(1), pages 274-286, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibn:assjnl:v:12:y:2016:i:1:p:274-286
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hans Loof & Almas Heshmati, 2006. "On the relationship between innovation and performance: A sensitivity analysis," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4-5), pages 317-344.
    2. David Albury, 2005. "Fostering Innovation in Public Services," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 51-56, January.
    3. Mark Moore & Jean Hartley, 2008. "Innovations in governance," Public Management Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 3-20, January.
    4. Dr Alex Bryson, 2009. "How Does Innovation Affect Worker Wellbeing?," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 348_1, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    5. Jean Hartley, 2005. "Innovation in Governance and Public Services: Past and Present," Public Money & Management, Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, vol. 25(1), pages 27-34, January.
    6. David Albury, 2005. "Fostering Innovation in Public Services," Public Money & Management, Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy, vol. 25(1), pages 51-56, January.
    7. Jean Hartley, 2005. "Innovation in Governance and Public Services: Past and Present," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 27-34, January.
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