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The Mediating Role Of Attitudes In Trading Companies’ Shares


  • Azwadi Ali

    () (Faculty of Management and Economics, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu)


The survival of publicly listed companies largely depends on their shares being liquidly traded. This goal can be achieved when new investors are attracted to trade on companies’ shares. Among different groups of investors, individual investors are generally less able to objectively evaluate companies’ risks and returns, and tend to be emotionally biased in their trading decisions. Therefore their decisions may be formed as a result of ‘perceived’ risks and returns, and influenced by companies’ images. This study finds that ‘attitude towards brand’ mediates moderately the relationships between its perceptual antecedents and individual investors’ trading decisions. This finding suggests that in courting individual investors, companies may adopt adequate marketing strategies to leverage with their current financial performance as such strategies should enhance their images that attract investors to trade on their shares.

Suggested Citation

  • Azwadi Ali, 2011. "The Mediating Role Of Attitudes In Trading Companies’ Shares," Journal of Global Business and Economics, Global Research Agency, vol. 3(1), pages 57-73, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:grg:01biss:v:3:y:2011:i:1:p:57-73

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Behavioral Finance; Investment; Attitude towards Brand;

    JEL classification:

    • M0 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - General


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