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New Product Development and Innovation in the Maquiladora Industry: A Causal Model

Author

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  • Jorge Luis García-Alcaraz

    (Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Autonomous University of Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez 32310, Mexico)

  • Aidé Aracely Maldonado-Macías

    (Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Autonomous University of Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez 32310, Mexico)

  • Sandra Ivette Hernández-Hernández

    (Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Autonomous University of Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez 32310, Mexico)

  • Juan Luis Hernández-Arellano

    (Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Autonomous University of Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez 32310, Mexico)

  • Julio Blanco-Fernández

    (Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of La Rioja, La Rioja 26004, Spain)

  • Juan Carlos Sáenz Díez-Muro

    (Department of Electric Engineering, University of La Rioja, La Rioja 26004, Spain)

Abstract

Companies seek to stand out from their competitors and react to other competitive threats. Making a difference means doing things differently in order to create a product that other companies cannot provide. This can be achieved through an innovation process. This article analyses, by means of a structural equation model, the current situation of Mexican maquiladora companies, which face the constant challenge of product innovation. The model associates three success factors for new product development (product, organization, and production process characteristics as independent latent variables) with benefits gained by customers and companies (dependent latent variables). Results show that, in the Mexican maquiladora sector, organizational characteristics and production processes characteristics explain only 31% of the variability (R 2 = 0.31), and it seems necessary to integrate other aspects. The relationship between customer benefits and company benefits explains 58% of the variability, the largest proportion in the model (R 2 = 0.58).

Suggested Citation

  • Jorge Luis García-Alcaraz & Aidé Aracely Maldonado-Macías & Sandra Ivette Hernández-Hernández & Juan Luis Hernández-Arellano & Julio Blanco-Fernández & Juan Carlos Sáenz Díez-Muro, 2016. "New Product Development and Innovation in the Maquiladora Industry: A Causal Model," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-18, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:8:p:707-:d:74635
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    References listed on IDEAS

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