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Examining the Factors Influencing Transport Sector CO 2 Emissions and Their Efficiency in Central China

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  • Huali Sun

    () (School of Management, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China)

  • Mengzhen Li

    () (School of Management, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444, China)

  • Yaofeng Xue

    () (Department of Education Information Technology, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China)

Abstract

The fast development of the transport sector has resulted in high energy consumption and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in China. Though existing studies are concerned with the factors influencing transport sector CO 2 emissions at the national level (or in megacities), little attention has been paid to the comprehensive impact of socio-economic, urban form, and transportation development on transport sector carbon emissions and emissions efficiency in central China. This paper examines the comprehensive impact of the transport sector’s carbon emissions from six provinces in central China, during the period from 2005 to 2016, based on the panel data model. The dynamic change of CO 2 emissions efficiency is then analyzed using the Global Malmquist Luenberger Index. The results indicate that, firstly, economic growth, road density, the number of private vehicles, and the number of public vehicles have caused greater CO 2 emissions during the study period, while the freight turnover, urbanization level, and urban population density had repressing effects on CO 2 emissions. Secondly, an uneven distribution of CO 2 emissions and CO 2 emissions efficiency was found among different provinces in central China. Thirdly, changes in CO 2 emissions efficiency were mainly due to technical changes. Finally, we present some policy suggestions to mitigate transport sector CO 2 emissions in central China.

Suggested Citation

  • Huali Sun & Mengzhen Li & Yaofeng Xue, 2019. "Examining the Factors Influencing Transport Sector CO 2 Emissions and Their Efficiency in Central China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(17), pages 1-15, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:17:p:4712-:d:262076
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    transport sector CO 2 emissions; influence factors; efficiency; panel data; Global Malmquist Luenberger (GML); central China;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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