IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jsusta/v11y2019i15p4168-d254060.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Urban System in Serbia—The Factor in the Planning of Balanced Regional Development

Author

Listed:
  • Zora Živanović

    () (Faculty of Geography, University of Belgrade, Studentski Trg 3/3, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia)

  • Branka Tošić

    () (Faculty of Geography, University of Belgrade, Studentski Trg 3/3, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia)

  • Teodora Nikolić

    () (Faculty of Geography, University of Belgrade, Studentski Trg 3/3, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia)

  • Dragica Gatarić

    () (Faculty of Geography, University of Belgrade, Studentski Trg 3/3, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the basic characteristics of Serbia’s urban system after World War II. The term urban system is largely determined by the use and functioning of the space in which it exists. We used the methods common in urban geography, notably the Rank-Size Rule and the Law of the Primate City with the aim of identifying the basic regularities, as the first step in an in-depth study of an under-researched topic. The research seeks to contribute to explaining the causes of the previous and current situation in the national settlement network, as a prerequisite for planning the future organization of the settlement network. Our study, conducted in Serbia, finds polarization apparent in the prominent domination of the capital city in terms of population, and this is a key feature of Serbia’s urban system. The current situation is the result of an intensive process of urbanization, but also of the establishment of new administrative boundaries after the disintegration of Yugoslavia. The study also seeks to suggest the most appropriate development model for Serbia’s urban system that could help overcome the extreme population concentration in Belgrade and create a basis for organizing an optimal system of centers. Keeping in mind that uneven regional development is determined by the features of the urban system, polycentric development is a common model for overcoming extreme polarization on a global level.

Suggested Citation

  • Zora Živanović & Branka Tošić & Teodora Nikolić & Dragica Gatarić, 2019. "Urban System in Serbia—The Factor in the Planning of Balanced Regional Development," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(15), pages 1-19, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:15:p:4168-:d:254060
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/11/15/4168/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/11/15/4168/
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Overman, Henry G. & Ioannides, Yannis M., 2001. "Cross-Sectional Evolution of the U.S. City Size Distribution," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 543-566, May.
    2. Paul Cheshire, 1995. "A New Phase of Urban Development in Western Europe? The Evidence for the 1980s," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(7), pages 1045-1063, August.
    3. Alperovich, Gershon, 1984. "The size distribution of cities: On the empirical validity of the rank-size rule," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 232-239, September.
    4. Makoto Okumura & Makoto Tsukai & Naoki Takada, 2010. "A Rank Size Rule In A Firm, Produced From A Hierarchical Branch Office Location Model," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2‐3), pages 73-88, July.
    5. Ioannides, Yannis M. & Overman, Henry G., 2003. "Zipf's law for cities: an empirical examination," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 127-137, March.
    6. Miguel Puente-Ajovín & Arturo Ramos, 2015. "On the parametric description of the French, German, Italian and Spanish city size distributions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 489-509, March.
    7. Rosen, Kenneth T. & Resnick, Mitchel, 1980. "The size distribution of cities: An examination of the Pareto law and primacy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 165-186, September.
    8. Edward L. Glaeser & Matt Resseger & Kristina Tobio, 2009. "Inequality In Cities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 617-646, October.
    9. Evert Meijers & Martijn Burger & Edward L. Glaeser & Giacomo A. M. Ponzetto & Yimei Zou, 2016. "Urban networks: Connecting markets, people, and ideas," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(1), pages 17-59, March.
    10. Simin Davoudi, 2003. "EUROPEAN BRIEFING: Polycentricity in European spatial planning: from an analytical tool to a normative agenda," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(8), pages 979-999, December.
    11. Xavier Gabaix, 1999. "Zipf's Law for Cities: An Explanation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 739-767.
    12. Edvard Jakopin & Jurij Bajec, 2009. "Challenges of Industrial Development of Serbia," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 56(4), pages 507-525, December.
    13. Roberta Capello & Roberto Camagni, 2000. "Beyond Optimal City Size: An Evaluation of Alternative Urban Growth Patterns," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 37(9), pages 1479-1496, August.
    14. P Gordon & H W Richardson & H L Wong, 1986. "The Distribution of Population and Employment in a Polycentric City: The Case of Los Angeles," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 18(2), pages 161-173, February.
    15. Ahjond S. Garmestani & Craig R. Allen & Colin M. Gallagher & John D. Mittelstaedt, 2007. "Departures from Gibrat's Law, Discontinuities and City Size Distributions," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(10), pages 1997-2007, September.
    16. Christopher Kennedy & John Cuddihy & Joshua Engel‐Yan, 2007. "The Changing Metabolism of Cities," Journal of Industrial Ecology, Yale University, vol. 11(2), pages 43-59, April.
    17. Sukkoo Kim & Marc T. Law, 2012. "History, Institutions, And Cities: A View From The Americas," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 10-39, February.
    18. France Guerin-Pace, 1995. "Rank-Size Distribution and the Process of Urban Growth," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(3), pages 551-562, April.
    19. Michael Storper & Charles van Marrewijk & Frank G. van Oort, 2012. "Introduction: Processes Of Change In Urban Systems," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 1-9, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Abdul Shaban & Karima Kourtit & Peter Nijkamp, 2020. "India’s Urban System: Sustainability and Imbalanced Growth of Cities," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(7), pages 1-1, April.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Soo, Kwok Tong, 2005. "Zipf's Law for cities: a cross-country investigation," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 239-263, May.
    2. Valente J. Matlaba & Mark J. Holmes & Philip McCann & Jacques Poot, 2013. "A Century Of The Evolution Of The Urban System In Brazil," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 129-151, November.
    3. Anderson, Gordon & Ge, Ying, 2005. "The size distribution of Chinese cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 756-776, November.
    4. Gabaix, Xavier & Ioannides, Yannis M., 2004. "The evolution of city size distributions," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 53, pages 2341-2378, Elsevier.
    5. Giorgio Fazio & Marco Modica, 2015. "Pareto Or Log-Normal? Best Fit And Truncation In The Distribution Of All Cities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(5), pages 736-756, November.
    6. Ramos, Arturo & Sanz-Gracia, Fernando, 2015. "US city size distribution revisited: Theory and empirical evidence," MPRA Paper 64051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Arshad, Sidra & Hu, Shougeng & Ashraf, Badar Nadeem, 2019. "Zipf’s law, the coherence of the urban system and city size distribution: Evidence from Pakistan," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 513(C), pages 87-103.
    8. Bosker, Maarten & Brakman, Steven & Garretsen, Harry & Schramm, Marc, 2008. "A century of shocks: The evolution of the German city size distribution 1925-1999," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 330-347, July.
    9. Duranton, Gilles & Puga, Diego, 2014. "The Growth of Cities," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 5, pages 781-853, Elsevier.
    10. Rafael González-Val, 2012. "A Nonparametric Estimation of the Local Zipf Exponent for all US Cities," Environment and Planning B, , vol. 39(6), pages 1119-1130, December.
    11. Esteban Rossi-Hansberg & Mark L. J. Wright, 2007. "Urban Structure and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 597-624.
    12. Duranton, Gilles, 2002. "City size distributions as a consequence of the growth process," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20065, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Kristian Giesen & Jens Südekum, 2011. "Zipf's law for cities in the regions and the country," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(4), pages 667-686, July.
    14. Rafael González‐Val, 2019. "Historical urban growth in Europe (1300–1800)," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(2), pages 1115-1136, April.
    15. Makoto Okumura & Makoto Tsukai & Naoki Takada, 2010. "A Rank Size Rule In A Firm, Produced From A Hierarchical Branch Office Location Model," Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(2‐3), pages 73-88, July.
    16. Nitsch, Volker, 2005. "Zipf zipped," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 86-100, January.
    17. Goerlich Gisbert Francisco J. & Mas Ivars Matilde, 2008. "Sobre el tamaño de las ciudades en España: Dos reflexiones y una regularidad empírica," Working Papers 201079, Fundacion BBVA / BBVA Foundation.
    18. Rafael Gonz�lez-Val & Luis Lanaspa, 2016. "Patterns in US Urban Growth, 1790-2000," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 289-309, February.
    19. Córdoba, Juan-Carlos, 2008. "On the distribution of city sizes," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 177-197, January.
    20. Yannis M. Ioannides & Henry G. Overman, 2004. "Spatial evolution of the US urban system," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 131-156, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    urban system; hierarchy; Rank-Size Rule; polycentricity; Serbia;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:15:p:4168-:d:254060. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: https://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.