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Understanding Continuance Usage of Natural Gas: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Evaluation

Author

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  • Victor Fernández-Guzmán

    () (Graduate School of Business, ESAN University, Santiago de Surco 15023, Peru)

  • Edgardo R. Bravo

    () (Department of Engineering, Universidad del Pacífico-Peru, Jesús María 15072, Peru)

Abstract

The adoption of natural gas increased notably last years, and there is some recognition that it improves the quality of life of inhabitants. While initial acceptance is an essential first step, the continued use is relevant to the long-term success of any technology. However, the literature on energy has focused on adoption and has devoted less attention to models that explain continuance usage. Accordingly, this study developed a model to explain continuance usage, grounded in Expectation-Confirmation Model (ECM). Unlike adoption models, confirmation of previous expectations and satisfaction with the experience of use have a relevant role in this phenomenon. Data was gathered through a questionnaire to 435 users of the service in a Latin American metropolis, and structural equations model was used for analysis. The results show that constructs of the ECM (perceived usefulness, disconfirmation, and satisfaction) influences on continuance intention. While the price impacts as expected, it is surprising that environmental consciousness strongly impacts the intention. These results may be useful for public agents to foster more comprehensive policies (beyond traditional: price and access), which include environmental and safety issues to consolidate the use of this energy source. Energy companies should develop strategies to manage consumer expectations and loyalty programs based on a high level of satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Victor Fernández-Guzmán & Edgardo R. Bravo, 2018. "Understanding Continuance Usage of Natural Gas: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Evaluation," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(8), pages 1-17, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jeners:v:11:y:2018:i:8:p:2019-:d:161659
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Nazia Yasmin & Philipp Grundmann, 2019. "Pre- and Post-Adoption Beliefs about the Diffusion and Continuation of Biogas-Based Cooking Fuel Technology in Pakistan," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(16), pages 1-16, August.
    2. Imdadullah Hidayat-ur-Rehman & Muhammad Shakaib Akram & Aneela Malik & Shamsul A. Mokhtar & Zeeshan Ahmed Bhatti & Muhammad Asif Khan, 2020. "Exploring the Determinants of Digital Content Adoption By Academics: The Moderating Role of Environmental Concerns and Price Value," SAGE Open, , vol. 10(2), pages 21582440209, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    natural gas; continuance usage; expectation-confirmation;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q49 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Other

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