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Consumer Attitudes towards Industrial CO 2 Capture and Storage Products and Technologies

Author

Listed:
  • Valentina Kashintseva

    () (Department of Physics and Aerodynamics, Moscow State University of Civil Engineering—National Research University, Yaroslavskoye Shosse 26, 129337 Moscow, Russia)

  • Wadim Strielkowski

    () (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, 303 Giannini Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA)

  • Justas Streimikis

    () (Lithuanian Institute of Agricultural Economics, V. Kudirkos g. 18, 01113 Vilnius, Lithuania)

  • Tatiana Veynbender

    () (Department of Economics and Production Management, Tyumen Industrial University, Volodarskogo Street 38, 625000 Tyumen, Russia)

Abstract

This paper discusses and elicits consumer attitudes towards industrial carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (ICCS) products and technologies. It presents a comprehensive review of the relevant research literature on consumer attitudes towards ICCS represented by the willingness-to-pay (WTP) and willingness-to-accept (WTA) negative externalities and outcomes of the carbon capture and storage (the so-called “not-in-my-backyard” (NIMBY) approach). In addition, it employs a concise empirical model that uses the data from the online questionnaire survey conducted in 7 European Union (EU) countries with and without ICSS sites. Our results demonstrate that having at least one ICCS site significantly reduces the WTA for the ICCS products and technologies. It is shown that further increase of ICCS sites, including those in the neighboring regions and countries, leads to the increase of negative consumer attitudes to the ICCS technologies and renewable energy policies. It becomes apparent that the majority of consumers are willing to support industrial CO 2 capture and storage only if it happens far away from their dwellings. The outcomes of this paper might be informative for the EU local industries and policy-makers who are planning the location of ICCS sites and optimizing the public support for their endeavors. Moreover, they might be relevant for the stakeholders dealing with the threat of climate change and the necessity for the decarbonization of the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Valentina Kashintseva & Wadim Strielkowski & Justas Streimikis & Tatiana Veynbender, 2018. "Consumer Attitudes towards Industrial CO 2 Capture and Storage Products and Technologies," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(10), pages 1-14, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jeners:v:11:y:2018:i:10:p:2787-:d:176239
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Kowalska-Pyzalska, 2019. "Do Consumers Want to Pay for Green Electricity? A Case Study from Poland," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(5), pages 1-20, March.
    2. Joakim Haraldsson & Maria T. Johansson, 2019. "Barriers to and Drivers for Improved Energy Efficiency in the Swedish Aluminium Industry and Aluminium Casting Foundries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(7), pages 1-27, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    carbon capture and storage; energy efficiency; CO 2 emissions; consumer attitudes; sustainable technologies; energy and power;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q4 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy
    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy
    • Q47 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy Forecasting
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q49 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Other

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