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Public perception of carbon capture and storage (CCS): A review

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  • L׳Orange Seigo, Selma
  • Dohle, Simone
  • Siegrist, Michael

Abstract

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is regarded as an important bridging technology to a sustainable energy production. Whether it will be deployed on a large scale depends on both technological advances and social processes. Public perception of CCS can be crucial, and research interest in this topic has been growing. This review analyzes the public perception research thus far (42 articles were identified). Laypeople׳s concerns and spontaneous reactions to the technology have been thoroughly analyzed, and the results form a good basis for risk communication about CCS. What deserves more research is the role of the context (particularly the social context) in which CCS would be deployed. More case studies are also needed to gain a clearer picture of what matters for CCS acceptance at the project level, as opposed to societal acceptability of CCS.

Suggested Citation

  • L׳Orange Seigo, Selma & Dohle, Simone & Siegrist, Michael, 2014. "Public perception of carbon capture and storage (CCS): A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 848-863.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:38:y:2014:i:c:p:848-863
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2014.07.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Arning, K. & Offermann-van Heek, J. & Linzenich, A. & Kaetelhoen, A. & Sternberg, A. & Bardow, A. & Ziefle, M., 2019. "Same or different? Insights on public perception and acceptance of carbon capture and storage or utilization in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 235-249.
    2. Roettereng, Jo-Kristian Straete, 2016. "How the global and national levels interrelate in climate policymaking: Foreign Policy Analysis and the case of Carbon Capture Storage in Norway's foreign policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 475-484.
    3. Vögele, Stefan & Rübbelke, Dirk & Mayer, Philip & Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm, 2018. "Germany’s “No” to carbon capture and storage: Just a question of lacking acceptance?," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 214(C), pages 205-218.
    4. Yao, Xing & Zhong, Ping & Zhang, Xian & Zhu, Lei, 2018. "Business model design for the carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) project in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 519-533.
    5. Santori, Giulio & Charalambous, Charithea & Ferrari, Maria-Chiara & Brandani, Stefano, 2018. "Adsorption artificial tree for atmospheric carbon dioxide capture, purification and compression," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 1158-1168.
    6. Yang, Lin & Zhang, Xian & McAlinden, Karl J., 2016. "The effect of trust on people's acceptance of CCS (carbon capture and storage) technologies: Evidence from a survey in the People's Republic of China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 69-79.
    7. Zeng, Bingxin & Zhu, Lei & Yao, Xing, 2020. "Policy choice for end-of-pipe abatement technology adoption under technological uncertainty," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 121-130.
    8. Hao Yu & David M. Reiner & Hao Chen & Zhifu Mi, 2018. "A comparison of public preferences for different low-carbon energy technologies: Support for CCS, nuclear and wind energy in the United Kingdom," Working Papers EPRG 1810, Energy Policy Research Group, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge.
    9. Wang, Peng-Tao & Wei, Yi-Ming & Yang, Bo & Li, Jia-Quan & Kang, Jia-Ning & Liu, Lan-Cui & Yu, Bi-Ying & Hou, Yun-Bing & Zhang, Xian, 2020. "Carbon capture and storage in China’s power sector: Optimal planning under the 2 °C constraint," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 263(C).
    10. Knoblauch, Theresa A.K. & Trutnevyte, Evelina & Stauffacher, Michael, 2019. "Siting deep geothermal energy: Acceptance of various risk and benefit scenarios in a Swiss-German cross-national study," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 807-816.
    11. Fridahl, Mathias, 2017. "Socio-political prioritization of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 89-99.
    12. Chen, Zheng-Ao & Li, Qi & Liu, Lan-Cui & Zhang, Xian & Kuang, Liping & Jia, Li & Liu, Guizhen, 2015. "A large national survey of public perceptions of CCS technology in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 366-377.

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