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Market, Policies and Local Governance as Drivers of Environmental Public Benefits: The Case of the Localised Processed Tomato in Northern Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Mantino

    () (Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e L’Analisi Dell’Economia Agraria—CREA (Council for Agricultural Research and Economics), 00198 Rome, Italy)

  • Barbara Forcina

    () (Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e L’Analisi Dell’Economia Agraria—CREA (Council for Agricultural Research and Economics), 00198 Rome, Italy)

Abstract

This article explores the role of a specific Localised Agri-food System (LAFS) in the provision of Environmental and social benefits (ESBs) in densely cultivated, industrialised, and populated areas by analysing the core of the processing tomato supply chain of northern Italy (Parma and Piacenza). The research examines how the interplay of market drivers, public policies, and collective actions favoured farming, technological, and organisational innovations geared to support long-term economic growth and tackle, at the same time, environmental challenges. The tomato supply chain is characterised by a favourable convergence of attitudes, policies, and market conditions that over time allowed for fruitful interactions between private stakeholders and between the supply chain and public players. Decades of key stakeholders’ interconnections within the tomato supply chain led to a success story of economic growth and attention to a new balance between agro-industry and environment, for the benefit of producers/processors, consumers, and natural resources. Profitability strategies inevitably imply intensification of farming in order to maximise profit levels per hectare, however, the tomato supply chain found a collective motivation that could grant profitability and concurrently reward producers and processors for attention paid to safeguarding the environment—giving evidence that intensification does not necessarily conflict with requirements in support of sustainability.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Mantino & Barbara Forcina, 2018. "Market, Policies and Local Governance as Drivers of Environmental Public Benefits: The Case of the Localised Processed Tomato in Northern Italy," Agriculture, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-17, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jagris:v:8:y:2018:i:3:p:34-:d:133917
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mantino, Francesco, 2014. "Localised Agri-food Systems in Italy: strategies for competitiveness and role of institutional factors," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 183537, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Giaime Berti & Catherine Mulligan, 2016. "Competitiveness of Small Farms and Innovative Food Supply Chains: The Role of Food Hubs in Creating Sustainable Regional and Local Food Systems," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-31, July.
    3. Gema Cárdenas Alonso & Ana Nieto Masot, 2017. "Towards Rural Sustainable Development? Contributions of the EAFRD 2007–2013 in Low Demographic Density Territories: The Case of Extremadura (SW Spain)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(7), pages 1-20, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Mantino & Francesco Vanni, 2019. "Policy Mixes as a Strategy to Provide More Effective Social and Environmental Benefits: Evidence from Six Rural Areas in Europe," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(23), pages 1-17, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    localised agri-food systems; governance; quality schemes; sustainable agriculture; sustainable water management; water footprint; water use; water pollution;

    JEL classification:

    • Q1 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • Q14 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Finance
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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