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Terrorism and the resilience of cities

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  • James Harrigan
  • Philippe Martin

Abstract

The September 11 attacks in New York and Washington have forced Americans to confront the fact that to live or work in a large city is to be at greater risk of large-scale terrorism. What do these risks, and the public perception of them, imply for cities in general and the future of New York City in particular? In this article, the authors begin their exploration of this issue by examining why cities exist in the first place. To conduct their analysis, they simulate two key theoretical models of economic geography, using data that approximate the characteristics of a major U.S. city as well as estimates of the costs of the September 11 attacks. The authors conclude that the very forces that lead to city formation also lead cities to be highly resilient in the face of catastrophes such as terrorist attacks. They argue that New York City in particular is likely to continue to thrive despite any ongoing terrorist threat.

Suggested Citation

  • James Harrigan & Philippe Martin, 2002. "Terrorism and the resilience of cities," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 97-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:y:2002:i:nov:p:97-116:n:v.8no.2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Glaeser, Edward L. & Shapiro, Jesse M., 2002. "Cities and Warfare: The Impact of Terrorism on Urban Form," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 205-224, March.
    2. Gaspar, Jess & Glaeser, Edward L., 1998. "Information Technology and the Future of Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 136-156, January.
    3. Bart Hobijn, 2002. "What will homeland security cost?," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 21-33.
    4. Jason Bram & James A. Orr & Carol Rapaport, 2002. "Measuring the effects of the September 11 attack on New York City," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Nov, pages 5-20.
    5. Mitchell A. Petersen & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2002. "Does Distance Still Matter? The Information Revolution in Small Business Lending," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(6), pages 2533-2570, December.
    6. Donald R. Davis & David E. Weinstein, 2002. "Bones, Bombs, and Break Points: The Geography of Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1269-1289, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno S. Frey & Simon Luechinger & Alois Stutzer, 2007. "Calculating Tragedy: Assessing The Costs Of Terrorism," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 1-24, February.
    2. Abadie, Alberto & Dermisi, Sofia, 2008. "Is terrorism eroding agglomeration economies in Central Business Districts? Lessons from the office real estate market in downtown Chicago," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 451-463, September.
    3. Tavares, Jose, 2004. "The open society assesses its enemies: shocks, disasters and terrorist attacks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 1039-1070, July.
    4. Kelly Bergstrand & Brian Mayer & Babette Brumback & Yi Zhang, 2015. "Assessing the Relationship Between Social Vulnerability and Community Resilience to Hazards," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 122(2), pages 391-409, June.
    5. Fuerst, Franz, 2006. "The Aftermath of the 9/11 Attack in the New York City Office Market: A Review of Key Figures and Developments," MPRA Paper 13316, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 09 Feb 2009.
    6. Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban, 2004. "Cities under stress," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(5), pages 903-927, July.
    7. Tchai Tavor, 2014. "The Effect Of Terror Incidents On The Yield Of Index Markets For Developing And Developed Markets," Economy & Business Journal, International Scientific Publications, Bulgaria, vol. 8(1), pages 1148-1153.
    8. repec:eee:juecon:v:102:y:2017:i:c:p:52-75 is not listed on IDEAS

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