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Getting back on track: macroeconomic policy lessons from the financial crisis


  • John B. Taylor


This article reviews the role of monetary and fiscal policy in the financial crisis and draws lessons for future macroeconomic policy. It shows that policy deviated from what had worked well in the previous two decades by becoming more interventionist, less rules-based, and less predictable. The policy implications are thus that policy should “get back on track.” The article is a modified version of a presentation given at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s policy forum “Policy Lessons from the Economic and Financial Crisis,” December 4, 2009. The presentation was made during a panel discussion that also included James Bullard and N. Gregory Mankiw.

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  • John B. Taylor, 2010. "Getting back on track: macroeconomic policy lessons from the financial crisis," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 165-176.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrv:y:2010:i:may:p:165-176:n:v.92no.3

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John B. Taylor & John C. Williams, 2009. "A black swan in the money market," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Jan.
    2. John O’Neill, 2009. "Market," Chapters,in: Handbook of Economics and Ethics, chapter 42 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. John B. Taylor, 2007. "Housing and monetary policy," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 463-476.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fabio C. Bagliano & Claudio Morana, 2017. "It ain’t over till it’s over: A global perspective on the Great Moderation-Great Recession interconnection," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(49), pages 4946-4969, October.
    2. Cimadomo, Jacopo & Bénassy-Quéré, Agnès, 2012. "Changing patterns of fiscal policy multipliers in Germany, the UK and the US," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 845-873.
    3. Broda, Christian & Parker, Jonathan A., 2014. "The Economic Stimulus Payments of 2008 and the aggregate demand for consumption," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(S), pages 20-36.
    4. Didier, Tatiana & Hevia, Constantino & Schmukler, Sergio L., 2011. "How resilient and countercyclical were emerging economies to the global financial crisis ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5637, The World Bank.
    5. Cesa-Bianchi, Ambrogio & Rebucci, Alessandro, 2017. "Does easing monetary policy increase financial instability?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 111-125.
    6. Didier, Tatiana & Hevia, Constantino & Schmukler, Sergio L., 2012. "How resilient and countercyclical were emerging economies during the global financial crisis?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(8), pages 2052-2077.
    7. Baxa, Jaromír & Horváth, Roman & Vašíček, Bořek, 2013. "Time-varying monetary-policy rules and financial stress: Does financial instability matter for monetary policy?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 117-138.
    8. Steve Keen, 2013. "Predicting the ‘Global Financial Crisis’: Post-Keynesian Macroeconomics," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(285), pages 228-254, June.
    9. Nikola Mirkov, 2014. "International financial transmission of the Fed's monetary policy," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 7(2), pages 7-49, September.
    10. Wolfram Berger & Friedrich Kissmer, 2013. "Monetary Policy and Asset Prices: When Cleaning Up Hits the Zero Lower Bound," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 149(III), pages 291-312, September.
    11. Volha Audzei, 2015. "Information Acquisition and Excessive Risk: Impact of Policy Rate and Market Volatility," ACTA VSFS, University of Finance and Administration, vol. 9(2), pages 115-135.
    12. Thomas Theobald & Silke Tober & Emanuel List, 2015. "Finanzmarktstabilität in Zeiten unkonventioneller Geldpolitik," IMK Report 107-2015, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    13. Hansen, G.D. & Ohanian, L.E., 2016. "Neoclassical Models in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    14. Kowalski, Tadeusz, 2011. "Economic policy and the financial and economic crisis," MPRA Paper 33994, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    Macroeconomics ; Financial crises;


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