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Worker flows and matching efficiency


  • Marcelo Veracierto


Although job vacancies have increased quite significantly since mid-2009, the unemployment rate has not declined significantly. This article analyzes the matching efficiency of jobs and workers in U.S. labor markets and its impact on the behavior of the unemployment rate and other labor market outcomes since the start of the latest recession.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcelo Veracierto, 2011. "Worker flows and matching efficiency," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 147-169.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2011:i:qiv:p:147-169:n:v.35no.4

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    2. Regis Barnichon & Andrew Figura, 2010. "What drives movements in the unemployment rate? a decomposition of the Beveridge curve," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-48, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Gadi Barlevy, 2011. "Evaluating the role of labor market mismatch in rising unemployment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q III, pages 82-96.
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    Cited by:

    1. Beauchemin, Kenneth & Tasci, Murat, 2014. "Diagnosing Labor Market Search Models: A Multiple-Shock Approach," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(03), pages 548-572, April.
    2. Gadi Barlevy, 2011. "Evaluating the role of labor market mismatch in rising unemployment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q III, pages 82-96.
    3. Sedláček, Petr, 2014. "Match efficiency and firms' hiring standards," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 123-133.
    4. Modestino, Alicia Sasser & Shoag, Daniel & Ballance, Joshua, 2016. "Downskilling: changes in employer skill requirements over the business cycle," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 333-347.
    5. Michael Christl & Monika Köppl–Turyna & Dénes Kucsera, 2016. "Structural unemployment after the crisis in Austria," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, December.
    6. Michael W. L. Elsby & Ryan Michaels & David Ratner, 2015. "The Beveridge Curve: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(3), pages 571-630, September.

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    Labor market ; Unemployment ; Population;


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