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Small Businesses and the Shadow Economy

This paper investigates causalities between small businesses and the shadow economy in ten New Member States of the European Union in the years 2000–2005. The transition from a centrally planned to a market economy, with deregulation and privatization of economic activities, has yielded new opportunities for small businesses, new entrepreneurial ideas, and new income sources in these countries. Yet, rigid legislation, high tax wedges, and transaction costs of government institutions have increased the incentives for people to take their work into the shadow economy. To account for the simultaneity and latent variable effects we apply the instrumental variables econometric approach to study the association between small business and the shadow economy. We find that these variables are (weakly) negatively correlated, implying that the macroeconomic environment and institutional framework have improved, encouraging entrepreneurial activities while somewhat impeding the further development of the shadow economy.

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Article provided by Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences in its journal Finance a uver - Czech Journal of Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 58 (2008)
Issue (Month): 01-02 (January)
Pages: 68-81

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Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:58:y:2008:i:1-2:p:68-81
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  1. Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-De-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2002. "The Regulation Of Entry," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 117(1), pages 1-37, February.
  2. Jay Pil Choi & Marcel Thum, 2005. "Corruption And The Shadow Economy," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 817-836, 08.
  3. Bartelsman, Eric & Haltiwanger, John C. & Scarpetta, Stefano, 2004. "Microeconomic Evidence of Creative Destruction in Industrial and Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 1374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Ertugrul Deliktas & Mehmet Balcilar, 2005. "A Comparative Analysis of Productivity Growth, Catch-Up, and Convergence in Transition Economies," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 41(1), pages 6-28, January.
  5. Roy Thurik & Isabel Grilo, 2006. "Entrepreneurship in the old en new Europe," Scales Research Reports N200516, EIM Business and Policy Research.
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