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Reforms and Entry: Some Evidence from the Indian Manufacturing Sector

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  • Sumon Kumar Bhaumik
  • Shubhashis Gangopadhyay
  • Shagun Krishnan

Abstract

Traditional research in the context of product market entry has explored the strategic reactions of incumbent firms when threatened by the possibility of entry, and have identified industry-specific factors that affect entry rates. However, following de Soto (1989 ), there has been increasing emphasis on regulatory and institutional factors governing entry rates, especially in the context of developing countries. Using three-digit industry-level data from India, for the 1984-97 period, we examine the phenomenon of entry in the Indian context. Our empirical results suggest that during the 1980s industry-level factors largely explained variations in entry rates, but that, following the economic federalism brought about by the post-1991 reforms, variations in entry rates during the 1990s were explained largely by state-level institutional and legacy factors. Past productivity growth affects net entry rates as well. Copyright © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Sumon Kumar Bhaumik & Shubhashis Gangopadhyay & Shagun Krishnan, 2009. "Reforms and Entry: Some Evidence from the Indian Manufacturing Sector," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(4), pages 658-672, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:13:y:2009:i:4:p:658-672
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    Cited by:

    1. Dong, Zhiqiang & Zhang, Yongjing, 2016. "Accumulated social capital, institutional quality, and economic performance: Evidence from China," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 206-219.
    2. repec:kap:asiapa:v:34:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10490-016-9477-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. OKUBO Toshihiro & TOMIURA Eiichi, 2010. "Productivity Distribution, Firm Heterogeneity, and Agglomeration: Evidence from firm-level data," Discussion papers 10017, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. Sumon K. Bhaumik & Ying Zhou, 2014. "Do business groups help or hinder technological progress in emerging markets? Evidence from India," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1066, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    5. Aradhna Aggarwal & Takahiro Sato, 2015. "Identifying High Growth Firms in India: An Alternative Approach," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-14, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    6. Allard, Gayle & Martinez, Candace A. & Williams, Christopher, 2012. "Political instability, pro-business market reforms and their impacts on national systems of innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, pages 638-651.
    7. Bhaumik, Sumon Kumar & Co, Catherine Yap, 2011. "China's economic cooperation related investment: An investigation of its direction and some implications for outward investment," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 75-87, March.

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