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The Demographic Challenge of the Interconnected Education and Pension System in the Czech Republic

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Abstract

In their recent paper, Boldrin and Montes (2005) analyzed the “return on human capital investment” theory and showed that if borrowing for education is not possible, then a combined public education and pension system that uses lump-sum revenue from taxes and income transfers can replicate the first-best decentralized allocation achieved in an economy without taxes, where borrowing for human-capital accumulation (education) is permitted. Taking into account that such borrowing is either absent or inefficient in many countries, a combined public education/public pension scheme might prove to be welfare enhancing. Guided by this theoretical framework, the authors calibrate the parameters of an interconnected pension and education system for the Czech Republic under different demographic scenarios and fiscal rules. They also model the impact of increases in the retirement age and of a hypothetical unbalancing of pensions or educational transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergey SLOBODYAN & Viatcheslav VINOGRADOV, 2006. "The Demographic Challenge of the Interconnected Education and Pension System in the Czech Republic," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 56(11-12), pages 490-505, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:56:y:2006:i:11-12:p:490-505
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    1. Mulligan Casey B & Sala-i-Martin Xavier, 2004. "Political and Economic Forces Sustaining Social Security," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-56, May.
    2. Michele Boldrin & Ana Montes, 2005. "The Intergenerational State Education and Pensions," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(3), pages 651-664.
    3. Saint-Paul, Gilles & Verdier, Thierry, 1993. "Education, democracy and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 399-407, December.
    4. Auerbach, Alan J. & Kotlikoff, Laurence J. & Leibfritz, Willi (ed.), 1999. "Generational Accounting around the World," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226032139, October.
    5. Alan J. Auerbach & Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Willi Leibfritz, 1999. "Generational Accounting around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number auer99-1.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    public education; demographic development; pay-as-you-go pensions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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