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Getting a job through voluntary associations: the role of network and human capital creation

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  • Antoni Giacomo Degli

Abstract

The present paper draws on an original dataset collected by the author and investigates a particular role of voluntary associations in positively affecting individual and social welfare. We study if specific activities carried out by unemployed volunteers through their associational membership are useful in finding a job. The empirical analysis shows that some activities related to the creation of social network (the frequency of participation in informal meetings and work groups) and human capital (the attendance at training courses) positively and significantly affect the probability to get a job if unemployed.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoni Giacomo Degli, 2015. "Getting a job through voluntary associations: the role of network and human capital creation," QUADERNI DI ECONOMIA DEL LAVORO, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(103), pages 49-66.
  • Handle: RePEc:fan:quaqua:v:html10.3280/qua2015-103004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Meyer, Bruce D, 1990. "Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment Spells," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(4), pages 757-782, July.
    2. Montgomery, James D, 1991. "Social Networks and Labor-Market Outcomes: Toward an Economic Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1407-1418.
    3. Lionel Prouteau & Fran├žois-Charles Wolff, 2004. "Relational Goods and Associational Participation," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 75(3), pages 431-463, September.
    4. Nicholas M. Kiefer, 1985. "Evidence on the Role of Education in Labor Turnover," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, pages 445-452.
    5. Stephan Meier & Alois Stutzer, 2008. "Is Volunteering Rewarding in Itself?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(297), pages 39-59, February.
    6. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1056-1093.
    7. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1056-1093.
    8. Giacomo Degli Antoni, 2009. "Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Motivations to Volunteer and Social Capital Formation," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(3), pages 359-370, August.
    9. Menchik, Paul L. & Weisbrod, Burton A., 1987. "Volunteer labor supply," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 159-183.
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