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Money and Physical Capital Relationship: McKinnon’s Complementarity Hypothesis on Turkey’s Economy

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  • Muhammad Mehtab AZEEM

    (Istanbul Aydin University, Turkey
    Francois Rabelais University, France
    International Institute of Paris, France)

  • Ayub MOHAMMAD

    (International Institute of Paris, France)

Abstract

A complementary relationship between money and physical capital, emphasis on liberalization, financial liberalization theory and increased real interest rates will lead to a surge in money demand and investment. In this research paper, the validity of this hypothesis, which is also known as McKinnon's complementarity hypothesis, in terms of financial liberalization policy has been tested empirically to examine the performance, money demand, interest rate and investment size in order to attempt to designate the respective relationship in Turkey. In this study, over the period of 1999Q1-2014Q4 in Turkey, the relationship between money and physical capital for available data is investigated through the BOUND and ARDL test methods. Empirical analysis of the findings suggests that Turkey's economy is based on a limited complementary relationship between money and physical capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhammad Mehtab AZEEM & Ayub MOHAMMAD, 2015. "Money and Physical Capital Relationship: McKinnon’s Complementarity Hypothesis on Turkey’s Economy," Expert Journal of Finance, Sprint Investify, vol. 3(1), pages 21-30.
  • Handle: RePEc:exp:finnce:v:3:y:2015:i:1:p:21-30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial liberalization; McKinnon's complementarity hypothesis; money and physical capital; Bound test and ARDL method;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • F38 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Financial Policy: Financial Transactions Tax; Capital Controls
    • F40 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - General

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