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Work Rich, Time Poor? Time-Use of Women and Men in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Frances McGinnity

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

  • Helen Russell

    (The Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

Abstract

Are we running out of time? This paper uses data from a recently completed time-use survey in Ireland to consider whether the recent employment growth has led to high workloads, time-pressure and a lack of free time. We examine levels of total committed time, that is, time spent on employment/education, unpaid work (caring and household work) and travel, across different groups in the population. We find high workloads among the employed and those caring for young children and adults. High levels of committed time are found to be associated with greater subjective feelings of time-pressure. Our evidence suggests that recent employment growth is likely to have contributed to time poverty and feelings of time-pressure.

Suggested Citation

  • Frances McGinnity & Helen Russell, 2007. "Work Rich, Time Poor? Time-Use of Women and Men in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 38(3), pages 323-354.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:38:y:2007:i:3:p:323-354
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    File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol38_3/03%20Vol%2038%20McGinnity.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 969-1006.
    2. Gershuny, Jonathan, 2005. "Busyness as the badge of honour for the new superordinate working class," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. McGinnity, Frances & Russell, Helen & Williams, James & Blackwell, Sylvia, 2005. "Time Use in Ireland 2005: Survey Report," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BMI183.
    4. Russell, Helen & Layte, Richard & Maitre, Bertrand & O'Connell, Philip J. & Whelan, Christopher T., 2004. "Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS52.
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    Cited by:

    1. Frances McGinnity & Christopher Whelan, 2009. "Comparing Work-Life Conflict in Europe: Evidence from the European Social Survey," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 433-444, September.
    2. Bettina Sonnenberg & Michaela Riediger & Cornelia Wrzus & Gert G. Wagner, 2011. "Measuring Time Use in Surveys: How Valid Are Time Use Questions in Surveys? Concordance of Survey and Experience Sampling Measures," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 390, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Jamie Spinney & Hugh Millward, 2010. "Time and Money: A New Look at Poverty and the Barriers to Physical Activity in Canada," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 341-356, November.

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