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Busyness as the badge of honour for the new superordinate working class

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  • Gershuny, Jonathan

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  • Gershuny, Jonathan, 2005. "Busyness as the badge of honour for the new superordinate working class," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2005-09
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2005-09.pdf
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    1. Gershuny, Jonathan, 2000. "Changing Times: Work and Leisure in Postindustrial Society," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287872.
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    Cited by:

    1. Panos, Sousounis, 2009. "The Impact of Work-Related Training on Employee Earnings: Evidence from Great Britain," MPRA Paper 14262, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ewa Jarosz, 2019. "Unequal Times: Social Structure, Temporal Perspective, and Time Allocation in Poland," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 141(3), pages 1189-1206, February.
    3. Filipe Almeida-Santos & Yekaterina Chzhen & Karen Mumford, 2010. "Employee training and wage dispersion: white- and blue-collar workers in Britain," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.),Jobs, Training, and Worker Well-being, volume 30, pages 35-60, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    4. Almudena Sevilla Sanz & Jose Ignacio GImenez Nadal, 2007. "A Note on Leisure Inequality in the US: 1965-2003," Economics Series Working Papers 374, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Lonnie Golden, 2009. "A Brief History of Long Work Time and the Contemporary Sources of Overwork," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 84(2), pages 217-227, January.
    6. Siddharth Vedula & Phillip H. Kim, 2018. "Marching to the beat of the drum: the impact of the pace of life in US cities on entrepreneurial work effort," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 569-590, March.
    7. Almeida-Santos, Filipe & Mumford, Karen A., 2006. "Employee Training, Wage Dispersion and Equality in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 2276, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Hobbes, Marieke & De Groot, Wouter T. & Van Der Voet, Ester & Sarkhel, Sukanya, 2011. "Freely Disposable Time: A Time and Money Integrated Measure of Poverty and Freedom," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2055-2068.
    9. Pierre Walthery & Jonathan Gershuny, 2019. "Improving Stylised Working Time Estimates with Time Diary Data: A Multi Study Assessment for the UK," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 144(3), pages 1303-1321, August.
    10. Kenyon, Susan & Lyons, Glenn, 2007. "Introducing multitasking to the study of travel and ICT: Examining its extent and assessing its potential importance," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 161-175, February.
    11. Fatima, Johra Kayeser & Di Mascio, Rita & Sharma, Piyush, 2020. "Demystifying the impact of self-indulgence and self-control on customer-employee rapport and customer happiness," Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Elsevier, vol. 53(C).
    12. Frances McGinnity & Helen Russell, 2007. "Work Rich, Time Poor? Time-Use of Women and Men in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 38(3), pages 323-354.
    13. Ignace Glorieux & Ilse Laurijssen & Joeri Minnen & Theun Tienoven, 2010. "In Search of the Harried Leisure Class in Contemporary Society: Time-Use Surveys and Patterns of Leisure Time Consumption," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 163-181, June.

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