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Liquidity risk and performance of banking system

  • Ahmed Arif
  • Ahmed Nauman Anees
Registered author(s):

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine liquidity risk in Pakistani banks and evaluate the effect on banks' profitability. Design/methodology/approach – Data are retrieved from the balance sheets, income statements and notes of 22 Pakistani banks during 2004-2009. Multiple regressions are applied to assess the impact of liquidity risk on banks' profitability. Findings – The results of multiple regressions show that liquidity risk affects bank profitability significantly, with liquidity gap and non-performing as the two factors exacerbating the liquidity risk. They have a negative relationship with profitability. Research limitations/implications – The period studied in this paper is 2004-2009, due to availability of the data. However, the sample period does not impair the findings since the sample includes 22 banks, which constitute the main part of the Pakistani banking system. Moreover, only profitability is used as the measure of performance. Economic factors contributing to liquidity risk are not covered in this paper. Originality/value – This is the first paper addressing the liquidity risk faced by the Pakistani banking system. Past researchers and practitioners have not given the proper attention to liquidity risk. This paper helps in understanding the factors of liquidity risk and their impact on the profitability of the banking system. The authors emphasise contemporary risk managers to mitigate liquidity risk by having sufficient cash resources. This will reduce the liquidity gap, thereby reducing the dependence on repo market.

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    Article provided by Emerald Group Publishing in its journal Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance.

    Volume (Year): 20 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 182-195

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    Handle: RePEc:eme:jfrcpp:v:20:y:2012:i:2:p:182-195
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    1. Goodhart, C., 2008. "Liquidity risk management," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 11, pages 39-44, February.
    2. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2003. "Liquidity Shortages and Banking Crises," NBER Working Papers 10071, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Harry Zheng & Yukun Shen, 2008. "Jump liquidity risk and its impact on CVaR," Journal of Risk Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(5), pages 477-492, November.
    4. Markus K. Brunnermeier & Motohiro Yogo, 2009. "A Note on Liquidity Risk Management," NBER Working Papers 14727, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Holmstrom, Bengt & Tirole, Jean, 2000. "Liquidity and Risk Management," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 295-319, August.
    6. Olivier Jeanne & Lars E.O. Svensson, 2004. "Credible Commitment to Optimal Escape from a Liquidity Trap: The Role of the Balance Sheet of an Independent Central Bank," NBER Working Papers 10679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Anil Kashyap & Raghuram Rajan & Jeremy S. Stein, 1998. "Banks as liquidity providers: an explanation for the co-existence of lending and deposit-taking," Proceedings 582, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    8. Evan Gatev & Philip E. Strahan, 2003. "Banks' Advantage in Hedging Liquidity Risk: Theory and Evidence from the Commercial Paper Market," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 03-01, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    9. Frederic S. Mishkin, 2006. "How Big a Problem is Too Big to Fail? A Review of Gary Stern and Ron Feldman's Too Big to Fail: The Hazards of Bank Bailouts," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 44(4), pages 988-1004, December.
    10. Shrimal Perera & Michael Skully & J. Wickramanayake, 2006. "Competition and structure of South Asian banking: a revenue behaviour approach," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(11), pages 789-801.
    11. Evan Gatev & Philip E. Strahan, 2003. "Banks' Advantage in Hedging Liquidity Risk: Theory and Evidence from the Commercial Paper Market," NBER Working Papers 9956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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