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Sector-Level Disaggregate Stochastic Trends in Mexico’s Real Output

  • Antonio E. Noriega


    (Department of Econometrics, Escuela de Economía, Universidad de Guanajuato)

Our aim is to examine whether sectorial production shocks have predominated in Mexico’s long annual real output, and whether shocks from different sectors are correlated. We study the long-run movement and comovements of 6 production sectors, using long, low frequency data for the Mexican economy from 1921 to 1993 and Johansen’s (1991, 1995) method to test for cointegration, that is, the possibility of common stochastic shocks driving growth among sectors. Under cointegration, the idiosyncratic sectorial shocks cancel out and vanish, giving rise to a (possibly multiple) stochastic growth component common to all (some) sectors. We show that the sources of permanent innovations in Mexico’s real output are more likely to come from sector-group-specific sources rather than from either independent sector-specific technological shocks, or common aggregate permanent innovations.

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Article provided by in its journal Economia Mexicana NUEVA EPOCA.

Volume (Year): XIII (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (January-June)
Pages: 29-42

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Handle: RePEc:emc:ecomex:v:13:y:2004:i:1:p:29-42
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  1. Perron, Pierre, 1989. "The Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(6), pages 1361-1401, November.
  2. Yin-Wong Cheung & Frank Westermann, 2003. "Sectoral trends and cycles in Germany," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 141-156, January.
  3. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1994. "Identification of the long-run and the short-run structure an application to the ISLM model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 7-36, July.
  4. Norrbin, S. C., 1995. "Disaggregate stochastic trends in industrial production," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 47(3-4), pages 327-333, March.
  5. Campbell, John & Perron, Pierre, 1991. "Pitfalls and Opportunities: What Macroeconomists Should Know about Unit Roots," Scholarly Articles 3374863, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-80, November.
  7. Steven N. Durlauf, 1989. "Output Persistence, Economic Structure, and the Choice of Stabilization Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 20(2), pages 69-136.
  8. Noriega, Antonio E. & de Alba, Enrique, 2001. "Stationarity and structural breaks -- evidence from classical and Bayesian approaches," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 503-524, December.
  9. Banerjee, Anindya & Dolado, Juan J. & Galbraith, John W. & Hendry, David, 1993. "Co-integration, Error Correction, and the Econometric Analysis of Non-Stationary Data," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288107, July.
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