IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Balancing Skilled with Unskilled Migration in an Urbanizing Agricultural Economy

Listed author(s):
  • Nguyen, Thinh T.
  • Saito, Hisamitsu
  • Isoda, Hiroshi
  • Ito, Shoichi

In the early stages of economic development, the migration of unskilled workers contributes to labor-intensive manufacturing production. In middle-income countries, however, the migration of skilled workers becomes the more important factor in economic progress. Evaluating the skill content of migration patterns therefore is essential to understanding migration’s economic implications. For this purpose, we investigate the determinants of skilled and unskilled migration decisions in Vietnam. Rural higher education is shown to promote knowledge-intensive production by encouraging skilled individuals to migrate to cities. In complementary fashion, commercial farm development helps alleviate urban overcrowding by encouraging unskilled individuals to remain at home.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X14002800
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 66 (2015)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 457-467

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:66:y:2015:i:c:p:457-467
DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.09.015
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Phan, Diep & Coxhead, Ian, 2010. "Inter-provincial migration and inequality during Vietnam's transition," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 100-112, January.
  2. Phan, Diep & Coxhead, Ian, 2013. "Long-run costs of piecemeal reform: Wage inequality and returns to education in Vietnam," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1106-1122.
  3. Blalock, Garrick & Gertler, Paul J., 2009. "How firm capabilities affect who benefits from foreign technology," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 192-199, November.
  4. Gary L. Hunt & Richard E. Mueller, 2004. "North American Migration: Returns to Skill, Border Effects, and Mobility Costs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 988-1007, November.
  5. Alan De Brauw, 2010. "Seasonal Migration and Agricultural Production in Vietnam," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(1), pages 114-139.
  6. Nong Zhu & Xubei Luo, 2010. "The impact of migration on rural poverty and inequality: a case study in China," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 191-204, March.
  7. Richard Adams, 2011. "Evaluating the Economic Impact of International Remittances On Developing Countries Using Household Surveys: A Literature Review," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(6), pages 809-828.
  8. Stark, Oded & Bloom, David E, 1985. "The New Economics of Labor Migration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 173-178, May.
  9. Nguyen, Loc Duc & Raabe, Katharina & Grote, Ulrike, 2015. "Rural–Urban Migration, Household Vulnerability, and Welfare in Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 79-93.
  10. Mckenzie, David & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "Network effects and the dynamics of migration and inequality: Theory and evidence from Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 1-24, September.
  11. Hisamitsu Saito & Munisamy Gopinath, 2011. "Knowledge Spillovers, Absorptive Capacity, And Skill Intensity Of Chilean Manufacturing Plants," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 83-101, February.
  12. Borjas, George J. & Bronars, Stephen G. & Trejo, Stephen J., 1992. "Self-selection and internal migration in the United States," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 159-185, September.
  13. Harinder Kohli & Ashok Sharma & Anil Sood & Haruhiko Kuroda, 2011. "Asia 2050: Realizing the Asian Century: Overview," Other Working Papers asia2050overview, Emerging Markets Forum.
  14. World Bank, 2008. "Vietnam : Higher Education and Skills for Growth," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7814, The World Bank.
  15. Enrico Moretti, 2004. "Workers' Education, Spillovers, and Productivity: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 656-690, June.
  16. Alan de Brauw & John Giles, 2017. "Migrant Opportunity and the Educational Attainment of Youth in Rural China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 52(1), pages 272-311.
  17. Minot, Nicholas & Goletti, Francesco, 2000. "Rice market liberalization and poverty in Viet Nam:," Research reports 114, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  18. Michael Quinn & Stephen Rubb, 2005. "The importance of education-occupation matching in migration decisions," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 153-167, February.
  19. Lan Vu & Linh Le & Nazeem Muhajarine, 2013. "Multilevel Determinants of Colleges/Universities Enrolment in Vietnam: Evidences from the 15% Sample Data of Population Census 2009," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 375-386, March.
  20. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
  21. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 1999. "A Theory of Urban Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 252-284, April.
  22. Junge, Vera & Revilla Diez, Javier & Schätzl, Ludwig, 2015. "Determinants and Consequences of Internal Return Migration in Thailand and Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 94-106.
  23. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:66:y:2015:i:c:p:457-467. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.