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Privatization of Education and Labor Force Inequality in Urban Francophone Africa: The Transition from School to Work in Ouagadougou

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  • Calvès, Anne E.
  • Kobiané, Jean-François
  • N’Bouké, Afiwa

Abstract

As in many other francophone African countries, there has been increased privatization of the school system in Burkina Faso since the 1990s, especially in urban areas. Based on a unique retrospective survey conducted in Ouagadougou, this research investigates a largely unexplored issue in Africa: the impact of private schooling on subsequent transition to paid employment. While private schooling accelerates entry into the paid labor market and increases the odds of getting a waged first job, multivariate analyses reveal that this advantage is caused by differentials in the educational attainment and socio-economic origin of school-leavers from private and public schools.

Suggested Citation

  • Calvès, Anne E. & Kobiané, Jean-François & N’Bouké, Afiwa, 2013. "Privatization of Education and Labor Force Inequality in Urban Francophone Africa: The Transition from School to Work in Ouagadougou," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 136-148.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:47:y:2013:i:c:p:136-148
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2013.03.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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