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How vehicle ownership affect time utilization on study, leisure, social activities, and academic performance of university students? A case study of engineering freshmen in a rural university in Thailand

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  • Limanond, Thirayoot
  • Jomnonkwao, Sajjakaj
  • Watthanaklang, Duangdao
  • Ratanavaraha, Vatanavongs
  • Siridhara, Siradol

Abstract

This study aims to investigate how the ownership of a private vehicle influences time utilization of university students, and whether it impacts their academic performance. This research analyzes travel/activity patterns of 130 engineering freshman students at a rural university in Thailand. An analysis of travel/activity data shows that vehicle ownership seems to play an important role in university student's time utilization on various activities. It was found that those students who own a vehicle tend to spend less time for academic purposes, and more on leisure and social activities than non-owner students. Nevertheless, a further study using regression analysis on academic performance shows that the ownership of a vehicle does not seem to have a significant impact on the grade point average of students, once the cognitive ability and gender are accounted for. The findings imply that campus policies/measures that restrict the ownership or usage of a private vehicle in rural universities would improve the campus learning environment by influencing university students to put more attention on school-related activities, but such policies do not seem to impact on the academic performance of the college students.

Suggested Citation

  • Limanond, Thirayoot & Jomnonkwao, Sajjakaj & Watthanaklang, Duangdao & Ratanavaraha, Vatanavongs & Siridhara, Siradol, 2011. "How vehicle ownership affect time utilization on study, leisure, social activities, and academic performance of university students? A case study of engineering freshmen in a rural university in Thail," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 719-726, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:5:p:719-726
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ruiz, Tomás & Habib, Khandker Nurul, 2016. "Scheduling decision styles on leisure and social activities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 304-317.
    2. Lucas, Karen & Bates, John & Moore, José & Carrasco, Juan Antonio, 2016. "Modelling the relationship between travel behaviours and social disadvantage," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 157-173.

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