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Achieving sustainable urban transport mobility in post peak oil era

Author

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  • Aftabuzzaman, Md
  • Mazloumi, Ehsan

Abstract

Peak oil is the term used to describe the point at which global oil production will peak and thereafter start to decline. Recognising that transport uses a significant portion of global energy, the shortage of fossil fuel in post peak oil era will pose a global challenge in the transport sector. The paper presents an assessment of international research to illustrate the possible time frame of peak oil. It investigates the key implications of the oil shortage that threaten to render the urban transport system of Australia ineffective. Synthesis of documented research evidence suggests three major implications in the urban transport sector: (1) a reduction of mobility for individuals, (2) an increase of transport disadvantage, and (3) a disruption of urban freight movement. In addition, the paper explores strategies to cope with the devastating effects of the shortage of the fossil fuel in the post peak oil era. A number of strategies to achieve sustainable mobility in the future urban transport system are presented. These strategies are summarised into three main themes: (1) a mode shift to alternate transport modes, (2) an integration of land use and transport planning, and (3) a global technical effort for alternate fuels and vehicles. It is expected that a concerted global effort in this regard can have a far-reaching effect in achieving sustainability in urban transport mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Aftabuzzaman, Md & Mazloumi, Ehsan, 2011. "Achieving sustainable urban transport mobility in post peak oil era," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 695-702, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:18:y:2011:i:5:p:695-702
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Greene, David L. & Hopson, Janet L. & Li, Jia, 2006. "Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist's perspective," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 515-531, March.
    2. Kamakaté, Fatumata & Schipper, Lee, 2009. "Trends in truck freight energy use and carbon emissions in selected OECD countries from 1973 to 2005," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 3743-3751, October.
    3. Samimi, Rodney, 1995. "Road transport energy demand in Australia: A cointegration approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 329-339, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martos, A. & Pacheco-Torres, R. & Ordóñez, J. & Jadraque-Gago, E., 2016. "Towards successful environmental performance of sustainable cities: Intervening sectors. A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 479-495.
    2. Höök, Mikael & Tang, Xu, 2013. "Depletion of fossil fuels and anthropogenic climate change—A review," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 797-809.
    3. repec:eee:touman:v:43:y:2014:i:c:p:105-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:trapol:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:5-18 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Shepherd, Simon & Bonsall, Peter & Harrison, Gillian, 2012. "Factors affecting future demand for electric vehicles: A model based study," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 62-74.
    6. Jian Chai & Shubin Wang & Shouyang Wang & Ju’e Guo, 2012. "Demand Forecast of Petroleum Product Consumption in the Chinese Transportation Industry," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(3), pages 1-22, March.
    7. repec:eee:touman:v:64:y:2018:i:c:p:129-141 is not listed on IDEAS

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