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Activity–travel behaviour of non-workers from Bangalore City in India

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  • Manoj, M.
  • Verma, Ashish

Abstract

This paper presents exploratory and statistical analyses of the activity–travel behaviour of non-workers in Bangalore city in India. The study summarises the socio-demographic characteristics as well as the activity–travel behaviour of non-workers using a primary activity–travel survey data collected by the authors. Where possible, the research also compares the analysis findings with the case studies on activity–travel behaviour of non-workers, carried out in developed and developing countries. This gives an opportunity to understand the differences/similarities in the activity–travel behaviour of non-workers across diverse socio-cultural settings. The preliminary exploratory analysis shed light on the differences in activity participation, trip chaining, time-of-day preference for trip departure, and mode use behaviour of non-workers in Bangalore city. Statistical models were developed for investigating the effects of individual and household socio-demographics, land use parameters, and travel context attributes on activity participation, trip chaining, time-of-day choice, and mode choice decisions of non-workers. A few important results of the analysis are the influence of viewing television at home on out-of-home activity participation and trip-chaining behaviour, and the impact of in-home maintenance activity duration on time-of-day choice. Further, based on the findings of the initial analyses, an attempt has been made in this study to develop an integrated model that links time allocation, time-of-day choice, and trip chaining behaviour of non-workers. The study also discusses the implications of the research findings for transportation planning and policy for Bangalore city.

Suggested Citation

  • Manoj, M. & Verma, Ashish, 2015. "Activity–travel behaviour of non-workers from Bangalore City in India," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 400-424.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:78:y:2015:i:c:p:400-424 DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2015.06.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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