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Identifying the early adopters of alternative fuel vehicles: A case study of Birmingham, United Kingdom

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  • Campbell, Amy R.
  • Ryley, Tim
  • Thring, Rob

Abstract

The transport sector has been identified as a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. As part of its emissions reduction strategy, the United Kingdom Government is demonstrating support for new vehicle technologies, paying attention, in particular, to electric vehicles.

Suggested Citation

  • Campbell, Amy R. & Ryley, Tim & Thring, Rob, 2012. "Identifying the early adopters of alternative fuel vehicles: A case study of Birmingham, United Kingdom," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(8), pages 1318-1327.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:8:p:1318-1327
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2012.05.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hidrue, Michael K. & Parsons, George R. & Kempton, Willett & Gardner, Meryl P., 2011. "Willingness to pay for electric vehicles and their attributes," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 686-705, September.
    2. Karplus, Valerie J. & Paltsev, Sergey & Reilly, John M., 2010. "Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general equilibrium analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 620-641, October.
    3. Musti, Sashank & Kockelman, Kara M., 2011. "Evolution of the household vehicle fleet: Anticipating fleet composition, PHEV adoption and GHG emissions in Austin, Texas," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 707-720, October.
    4. Romm, Joseph, 2006. "The car and fuel of the future," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(17), pages 2609-2614, November.
    5. Kurani, Kenneth S & Sperling, Daniel & Lipman, Timothy & Stanger, Deborah & Turrentine, Thomas & Stein, Aram, 1995. "Household Markets for Neighborhood Electric Vehicles in California," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt13v2w7x0, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    6. Ozaki, Ritsuko & Sevastyanova, Katerina, 2011. "Going hybrid: An analysis of consumer purchase motivations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2217-2227, May.
    7. Peter Gripaios, 2002. "The Failure of Regeneration Policy in Britain," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(5), pages 568-577.
    8. Anable, Jillian, 2005. "'Complacent Car Addicts' or 'Aspiring Environmentalists'? Identifying travel behaviour segments using attitude theory," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-78, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Larson, Paul D. & Viáfara, Jairo & Parsons, Robert V. & Elias, Arne, 2014. "Consumer attitudes about electric cars: Pricing analysis and policy implications," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 299-314.
    2. Wells, Peter & Varma, Adarsh & Newman, Dan & Kay, Duncan & Gibson, Gena & Beevor, Jamie & Skinner, Ian, 2013. "Governmental regulation impact on producers and consumers: A longitudinal analysis of the European automotive market," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 28-41.
    3. Hardman, Scott & Shiu, Eric & Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert & Turrentine, Thomas, 2017. "Barriers to the adoption of fuel cell vehicles: A qualitative investigation into early adopters attitudes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 166-182.
    4. Plötz, Patrick & Schneider, Uta & Globisch, Joachim & Dütschke, Elisabeth, 2014. "Who will buy electric vehicles? Identifying early adopters in Germany," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 96-109.
    5. Harrison, Gillian & Thiel, Christian, 2017. "An exploratory policy analysis of electric vehicle sales competition and sensitivity to infrastructure in Europe," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 165-178.
    6. Whitehead, Jake & Franklin, Joel P. & Washington, Simon, 2014. "The impact of a congestion pricing exemption on the demand for new energy efficient vehicles in Stockholm," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 24-40.
    7. Krupa, Joseph S. & Rizzo, Donna M. & Eppstein, Margaret J. & Brad Lanute, D. & Gaalema, Diann E. & Lakkaraju, Kiran & Warrender, Christina E., 2014. "Analysis of a consumer survey on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 14-31.
    8. Figenbaum, Erik & Assum, Terje & Kolbenstvedt, Marika, 2015. "Electromobility in Norway: Experiences and Opportunities," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 29-38.
    9. Newbery, David & Strbac, Goran, 2016. "What is needed for battery electric vehicles to become socially cost competitive?," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 5(C), pages 1-11.
    10. Petschnig, Martin & Heidenreich, Sven & Spieth, Patrick, 2014. "Innovative alternatives take action – Investigating determinants of alternative fuel vehicle adoption," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 68-83.
    11. Kihm, Alexander & Trommer, Stefan, 2014. "The new car market for electric vehicles and the potential for fuel substitution," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 147-157.
    12. Baltas, George & Saridakis, Charalampos, 2013. "An empirical investigation of the impact of behavioural and psychographic consumer characteristics on car preferences: An integrated model of car type choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 92-110.
    13. McCoy, Daire & Lyons, Sean, 2014. "The diffusion of electric vehicles: An agent-based microsimulation," MPRA Paper 54560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:eee:enepol:v:108:y:2017:i:c:p:474-486 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Hardman, Scott & Shiu, Eric & Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert, 2016. "Comparing high-end and low-end early adopters of battery electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 40-57.
    16. Wesche, Julius P. & Plötz, Patrick & Dütschke, Elisabeth, 2016. "How to trigger mass market adoption of electric vehicles? Factors predicting interest in electric vehicles in Germany," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S07/2016, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).

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