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A bi-objective cyclist route choice model

Author

Listed:
  • Ehrgott, Matthias
  • Wang, Judith Y.T.
  • Raith, Andrea
  • van Houtte, Chris

Abstract

It is widely acknowledged that cyclists choose their route differently to drivers of private vehicles. The route choice decision of commuter drivers is often modelled with one objective, to reduce their generalised travel cost, which is a monetary value representing the combined travel time and vehicle operating cost. Commuter cyclists, on the other hand, usually have multiple incommensurable objectives when choosing their route: the travel time and the suitability of a route. By suitability we mean non-subjective factors that characterise the suitability of a route for cycling, including safety, traffic volumes, traffic speeds, presence of bicycle lanes, whether the terrain is flat or hilly, etc. While these incommensurable objectives are difficult to be combined into a single objective, it is also important to take into account that each individual cyclist may prioritise differently between travel time and suitability when they choose a route.

Suggested Citation

  • Ehrgott, Matthias & Wang, Judith Y.T. & Raith, Andrea & van Houtte, Chris, 2012. "A bi-objective cyclist route choice model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 652-663.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:4:p:652-663
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2011.11.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bagloee, Saeed Asadi & Sarvi, Majid & Wallace, Mark, 2016. "Bicycle lane priority: Promoting bicycle as a green mode even in congested urban area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 102-121.
    2. Duque, Daniel & Lozano, Leonardo & Medaglia, Andrés L., 2015. "An exact method for the biobjective shortest path problem for large-scale road networks," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 242(3), pages 788-797.
    3. Cheng, Yung-Hsiang & Liu, Kuo-Chu, 2012. "Evaluating bicycle-transit users’ perceptions of intermodal inconvenience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1690-1706.
    4. Mishra, Sabyasachee & Khasnabis, Snehamay & Swain, Subrat, 2013. "Multi-entity perspective transportation infrastructure investment decision making," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 1-12.
    5. Minaei, Negin, 2014. "Do modes of transportation and GPS affect cognitive maps of Londoners?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 162-180.

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