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Trails, Lanes, or Traffic: Value of Different Bicycle Facilities Using Adaptive Stated-Preference Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Nebiyou Tilahun
  • Kevin Krizek
  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Abstract

This study evaluates individual preferences for five different cycling environments by trading off a higher travel time as a cost incurred when choosing a better facility while letting the user have the option of selecting a less attractive facility at a lower travel time. The tradeoff of travel time to amenities of a particular facility informs our understanding of the value attached to different attributes such as bike-lanes, off-road trails, or side-street parking. The facilities considered here are off-road facilities, in-traffic facilities with bike-lane and no side street parking, in-traffic facilities with a bike-lane and side street parking, in-traffic facilities with no bike-lane and no side street parking and in-traffic facilities with no bike-lane but with parking on the side. We find that respondents are willing to travel up to twenty minutes more to switch from an unmarked on-road facility with side parking to an off-road bicycle trail, with smaller changes associated with less dramatic improvements.

Suggested Citation

  • Nebiyou Tilahun & Kevin Krizek & David Levinson, 2007. "Trails, Lanes, or Traffic: Value of Different Bicycle Facilities Using Adaptive Stated-Preference Survey," Working Papers 200701, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:trailslanesortraffic
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    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/179949
    File Function: First version, 2007
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Angela S. Bergantino & Simona Bolis, 2003. "An Adaptive Conjoint Analysis of Freight Service Alternatives: Evaluating the Maritime Alternative," ERSA conference papers ersa03p428, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Hopkinson, P & Wardman, M, 1996. "Evaluating the demand for new cycle facilities," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 241-249, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kevin Krizek & Ahmed El-Geneidy & Kristin Thompson, 2007. "A detailed analysis of how an urban trail system affects cyclists’ travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 611-624, September.
    2. Ipek Sener & Naveen Eluru & Chandra Bhat, 2009. "An analysis of bicycle route choice preferences in Texas, US," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(5), pages 511-539, September.
    3. Damant-Sirois, Gabriel & El-Geneidy, Ahmed M., 2015. "Who cycles more? Determining cycling frequency through a segmentation approach in Montreal, Canada," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 113-125.
    4. Kamargianni, Maria, 2015. "Investigating next generation's cycling ridership to promote sustainable mobility in different types of cities," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 45-55.
    5. Broach, Joseph & Dill, Jennifer & Gliebe, John, 2012. "Where do cyclists ride? A route choice model developed with revealed preference GPS data," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1730-1740.
    6. Björklund, Gunilla & Isacsson, Gunnar, 2013. "Forecasting the impact of infrastructure on Swedish commuters’ cycling behaviour," Working papers in Transport Economics 2013:36, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    7. Ehrgott, Matthias & Wang, Judith Y.T. & Raith, Andrea & van Houtte, Chris, 2012. "A bi-objective cyclist route choice model," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 652-663.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General
    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior

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