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Analysis of mode choice for intercity travel: Application of a hybrid choice model to two distinct US corridors

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  • Hess, Stephane
  • Spitz, Greg
  • Bradley, Mark
  • Coogan, Matt

Abstract

With growing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions and traffic congestion, there is an emphasis on encouraging shifts to public transport, for both short and long distance travel. Major differences exist across countries in how successful these efforts are, and the United States is often used as the key example of a country with a strong resistance to shifting away from private car use. Even within the United States however, there is strong heterogeneity across regions and across different types of travellers. This paper seeks to add empirical evidence to understand the drivers of mode choice for intercity travel, using stated choice data from two major US intercity corridors: the Northeast Corridor (NEC) and the Cascade Corridor. We develop a hybrid choice model that allows for deterministic and random variations across travellers in their preferences, some of which can be linked to underlying attitudinal constructs. Our results highlight extensive heterogeneity and provide interesting insights into the drivers of behaviour, and the relationship between attitudes and actual choices. As an example, we see that for some groups, notably West Coast respondents, a stronger anti-car attitude is counter-acted by a reduced utility for non-car modes when making choices, possibly due quality of public transport provision. Similarly, for other groups, such as older and female travellers, a reduced concern for privacy, which would benefit public transport, is counter-acted by a stronger pro-car attitude. These findings highlight the complex way in which attitudes can influence choices and provide insights for targeted policy interventions. Through scenario testing, we also show how future modal split might change depending on how these patterns of heterogeneity evolve over time, noting that the way this might happen is of course unknown at present.

Suggested Citation

  • Hess, Stephane & Spitz, Greg & Bradley, Mark & Coogan, Matt, 2018. "Analysis of mode choice for intercity travel: Application of a hybrid choice model to two distinct US corridors," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 547-567.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:116:y:2018:i:c:p:547-567
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2018.05.019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Akshay Vij & Joan L. Walker, 2014. "Hybrid choice models: the identification problem," Chapters, in: Stephane Hess & Andrew Daly (ed.), Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 22, pages 519-564, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Francisco J. Bahamonde-Birke & Uwe Kunert & Heike Link & Juan de Dios Ortúzar, 2017. "About attitudes and perceptions: finding the proper way to consider latent variables in discrete choice models," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 475-493, May.
    3. John M. Rose & Michiel C.J. Bliemer, 2014. "Stated choice experimental design theory: the who, the what and the why," Chapters, in: Stephane Hess & Andrew Daly (ed.), Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 7, pages 152-177, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Ben-Akiva, Moshe & McFadden, Daniel & Train, Kenneth & Börsch-Supan, Axel, 2002. "Hybrid Choice Models: Progress and Challenges," Sonderforschungsbereich 504 Publications 02-29, Sonderforschungsbereich 504, Universität Mannheim;Sonderforschungsbereich 504, University of Mannheim.
    5. Daziano, Ricardo A., 2015. "Inference on mode preferences, vehicle purchases, and the energy paradox using a Bayesian structural choice model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 1-26.
    6. Carlo Giacomo Prato & Shlomo Bekhor & Cristina Pronello, 2012. "Latent variables and route choice behavior," Post-Print halshs-00733464, HAL.
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    8. Andrew Daly & Stephane Hess & Bhanu Patruni & Dimitris Potoglou & Charlene Rohr, 2012. "Using ordered attitudinal indicators in a latent variable choice model: a study of the impact of security on rail travel behaviour," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 267-297, March.
    9. Raveau, Sebastián & Yáñez, María Francisca & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2012. "Practical and empirical identifiability of hybrid discrete choice models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1374-1383.
    10. Bhat, Chandra R. & Dubey, Subodh K., 2014. "A new estimation approach to integrate latent psychological constructs in choice modeling," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 68-85.
    11. Maria Kamargianni & Moshe Ben-Akiva & Amalia Polydoropoulou, 2014. "Incorporating social interaction into hybrid choice models," Transportation, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1263-1285, November.
    12. Maya Abou-Zeid & Moshe Ben-Akiva, 2014. "Hybrid choice models," Chapters, in: Stephane Hess & Andrew Daly (ed.), Handbook of Choice Modelling, chapter 17, pages 383-412, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Vij, Akshay & Walker, Joan L., 2016. "How, when and why integrated choice and latent variable models are latently useful," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 192-217.
    14. Chorus, Caspar G. & Kroesen, Maarten, 2014. "On the (im-)possibility of deriving transport policy implications from hybrid choice models," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 217-222.
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    Cited by:

    1. Borhan, Muhamad Nazri & Ibrahim, Ahmad Nazrul Hakimi & Miskeen, Manssour A. Abdulasalm, 2019. "Extending the theory of planned behaviour to predict the intention to take the new high-speed rail for intercity travel in Libya: Assessment of the influence of novelty seeking, trust and external inf," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 373-384.
    2. Lee, Joon-Kyu & Kim, Sang Hyun & Sim, Ga Ram, 2019. "Mode choice behavior analysis of air transport on the introduction of remotely piloted passenger aircraft," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 48-55.

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