IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v60y2005i8p1815-1833.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Managed care and infant health: an evaluation of Medicaid in the US

Author

Listed:
  • Kaestner, Robert
  • Dubay, Lisa
  • Kenney, Genevieve

Abstract

In this study, we examine the effects of Medicaid managed care (MMC) on prenatal care utilization, infant birth weight, pre-term birth, and use of cesarean section in the United States. We obtain separate estimates of the effect of primary care case management managed care programs and health maintenance organization managed care plans on these outcomes. The results suggest the following: among white, non-Hispanic women, MMC was associated with a 2 percent decrease in the number of prenatal care visits and a 3-5 percent increase the incidence of inadequate prenatal care; MMC was associated with a significant increase in the incidence pre-term birth for non-Hispanic white women, but that this association does not appear to be causal; and MMC had no association with the incidence of cesarean section.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaestner, Robert & Dubay, Lisa & Kenney, Genevieve, 2005. "Managed care and infant health: an evaluation of Medicaid in the US," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(8), pages 1815-1833, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:8:p:1815-1833
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(04)00450-2
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert Kaestner & Lisa Dubay & Genevieve Kenney, 2002. "Medicaid Managed Care and Infant Health: A National Evaluation," NBER Working Papers 8936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dubay, Lisa & Kaestner, Robert & Waidmann, Timothy, 2001. "Medical malpractice liability and its effect on prenatal care utilization and infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 591-611, July.
    3. Currie, Janet & Fahr, John, 2005. "Medicaid managed care: effects on children's Medicaid coverage and utilization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 85-108, January.
    4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    5. Kotelchuck, M., 1994. "An evaluation of the Kessner Adequacy of Prenatal Care Index and a proposed Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 84(9), pages 1414-1420.
    6. Glied, Sherry, 2000. "Managed care," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 13, pages 707-753, Elsevier.
    7. Altenstetter, C., 2003. "Insights from health care in Germany," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 93(1), pages 38-44.
    8. Dubay, Lisa & Kaestner, Robert & Waidmann, Timothy, 1999. "The impact of malpractice fears on cesarean section rates," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 491-522, August.
    9. Levinson, Arik & Ullman, Frank, 1998. "Medicaid managed care and infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 351-368, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hope Corman & Dhaval Dave & Nancy E. Reichman, 2018. "Evolution of the Infant Health Production Function," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 85(1), pages 6-47, July.
    2. Cuellar, Alison Evans & Markowitz, Sara, 2007. "Medicaid policy changes in mental health care and their effect on mental health outcomes," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(1), pages 23-49, January.
    3. Marianne P. Bitler & Madeline Zavodny, 2014. "Medicaid: A Review of the Literature," NBER Working Papers 20169, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Lee, Ajin, 2020. "How do hospitals respond to managed care? Evidence from at-risk newborns," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 184(C).
    5. James Marton & Aaron Yelowitz, 2015. "Health insurance generosity and conditional coverage: Evidence from medicaid managed care in Kentucky," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 82(2), pages 535-555, October.
    6. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume 1, pages 21-136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Aparna Lhila & Sharon Long, 2012. "What is driving the black–white difference in low birthweight in the US?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(3), pages 301-315, March.
    8. Jonathan Gruber, 2017. "Delivering Public Health Insurance through Private Plan Choice in the United States," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 3-22, Fall.
    9. Bradley Herring & E. Kathleen Adams, 2011. "Using HMOs to serve the Medicaid population: what are the effects on utilization and does the type of HMO matter?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 446-460, April.
    10. Marton, James & Yelowitz, Aaron & Talbert, Jeffery C., 2014. "A tale of two cities? The heterogeneous impact of medicaid managed care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 47-68.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Robert Kaestner & Lisa Dubay & Genevieve Kenney, 2002. "Medicaid Managed Care and Infant Health: A National Evaluation," NBER Working Papers 8936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Anna Aizer & Janet Currie & Enrico Moretti, 2004. "Competition in Imperfect Markets: Does it Help California's Medicaid Mothers?," NBER Working Papers 10429, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Duggan, Mark, 2004. "Does contracting out increase the efficiency of government programs? Evidence from Medicaid HMOs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(12), pages 2549-2572, December.
    4. Ronen Avraham & Leemore S. Dafny & Max M. Schanzenbach, 2009. "The Impact of Tort Reform on Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Premiums," NBER Working Papers 15371, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Panthöfer, Sebastian, 2016. "Do Doctors Prescribe Antibiotics Out of Fear of Malpractice?," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145645, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Sofia Amaral‐Garcia & Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2015. "Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices? Evidence from Italy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(9), pages 1050-1064, September.
    7. Sofia Amaral-Garcia & Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2015. "Does Experience Rating Improve Obstetric Practices? Evidence From Geographical Discontinuities in Italy," CEIS Research Paper 342, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 May 2015.
    8. Bertoli, Paola & Grembi, Veronica, 2019. "Malpractice risk and medical treatment selection," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 22-35.
    9. Barili, Emilia & Bertoli, Paola & Grembi, Veronica, 2021. "Fee equalization and appropriate health care," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C).
    10. Scott Barkowski, 2017. "Does Regulation of Physicians Reduce Health Care Spending?," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 83(4), pages 1074-1097, April.
    11. Lakdawalla, Darius N. & Seabury, Seth A., 2012. "The welfare effects of medical malpractice liability," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 356-369.
    12. Ellyson, Alice M. & Robertson, Justin C., 2019. "Can malpractice pressure compel a physician to relocate?," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 37-48.
    13. Marton, James & Yelowitz, Aaron & Talbert, Jeffery C., 2014. "A tale of two cities? The heterogeneous impact of medicaid managed care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 47-68.
    14. Angelo Antoci & Alessandro Fiori Maccioni & Paolo Russu, 2018. "Medical practice and malpractice litigation in an evolutionary context," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 915-928, September.
    15. Lee, Ajin, 2020. "How do hospitals respond to managed care? Evidence from at-risk newborns," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 184(C).
    16. Malak, Natalie & Yang, Y. Tony, 2019. "A re-examination of the effects of tort reforms on obstetrical procedures and health outcomes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 184(C).
    17. Dubay, Lisa & Kaestner, Robert & Waidmann, Timothy, 2001. "Medical malpractice liability and its effect on prenatal care utilization and infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 591-611, July.
    18. Paola Bertoli & Veronica Grembi, 2017. "Medical Malpractice: How Legal Liability Affects Medical Decisions," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp600, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    19. Jonathan Klick & Thomas Stratmann, 2007. "Medical Malpractice Reform and Physicians in High-Risk Specialties," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(S2), pages 121-142, June.
    20. Javier Cano-Urbina & Daniel Montanera, 2017. "Do tort reforms impact the incidence of birth by cesarean section? A reassessment," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 103-112, March.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:8:p:1815-1833. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.