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How do individuals value health states? A qualitative investigation

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  • Karimi, M.
  • Brazier, J.
  • Paisley, S.

Abstract

Despite the importance of health state values in informing resource allocation in health care, there is arguably little known about how individuals value health. Previous studies have shown that a variety of non-health factors and beliefs are important in valuing health, but there is less evidence in the literature about how individuals' beliefs affect their preferences or what role non-health factors play in the process of forming preferences. This study investigated the thought processes of 21 U.K. based participants in March 2013 who valued health states using semi-structured interviews and a think-aloud protocol, with the aim to better understand the relationship between health states, the individual's underlying beliefs, and the individual's preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Karimi, M. & Brazier, J. & Paisley, S., 2017. "How do individuals value health states? A qualitative investigation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 172(C), pages 80-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:172:y:2017:i:c:p:80-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2016.11.027
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Devlin, N. & Shah, K. & Mulhern, B. & Pantiri, K. & van Hout, B., 2017. "A New Valuation Method: Directly Eliciting Personal Utility Functions," Research Papers 001885, Office of Health Economics.

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